Author Topic: Back button focus on mirrorless?  (Read 1514 times)

PeterN

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2020, 13:09:38 »
The main reason for using BBF to me is that it allows me not having to switch between AF-S and AF-C. Setting the camera to AF-C and push the back button once is like using AF-S. When I keep the back button pressed, I have AF-C. Quite useful when you shoot various objects/subjects.
Peter

MILLIREHM

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2020, 16:01:46 »
After reading the article once again I find the title even more misleading. Mr Steve Perry himself has not switched technique himself but just thought that shutter release AF in combination with simultaneousely chosing AF field by thumb might be more advantageous in combination of higher Af-field overage of the frame with the Z system.

I'd like to say that besides switching AF field ist not amongst what I'd call fast operation and a high number AF fields does not make it better, still dont see this as a game changer. Neither the main control dial nor the Subcontrol button are perfect tools for fast purposes, and i consider my D700 to have a better control ergonomy than the D4S that came afterwards. Thus I consider focussing and (slight) reframing to be faster.

What would bedifferent if the AF-field choice can be made by eye-view angle (Canon implemented this once but I cant remember that this had been considered as advanced enough to work). Recently eye detection AF works for human beings and for pets. Maybe in the future a more advanced eye detection system that can handle eyes of birds and other widlife creatures might turn automatic AF-field choice to a means of choice.
Wolfgang Rehm

paul hofseth

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #17 on: May 31, 2020, 16:28:27 »
I found this theme potentially interesting, but not as informtive as I might have wished.

as a constant, but somewhat dissatisfied  user of manual lenses on the olympus penF I have been considering the Z as a better alternative and  I have examined  the risk of  inadvertently pressing buttons on the Z that might interfere with manual focussing and light metering.

The penF has a wheel at the back that cannot be disabled (Short of using superglue and losing all opportunities to reach menu settings).

The problem is that when takoing a strong grip to steady a long and heavy lens like the 400mm ED-IF (with a speed-booster= effective 280mm, so still hand-holdable with sensor stabilization), the control wheel is pressed and moves the focus point. When both the   spotmetering + enlarged focus point where the focus ahs been set is moved, reframing  is bound to fail.

On inspecting the bodies in the local photo shop, I found that the Z has a similar suspicious-looking wheel ready to be squashed, as did the panasonic. the only body free of potentially disastrous buttons was the Leitz- Panasonic clone SL2, but that costs twice as much as the Z. 

p.

MILLIREHM

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2020, 16:44:23 »
NIkon SLRs have a Lock option for the main AF-field dial (occasionally i am running into having accidentially locked it!) this is not present with the Nikon Z-series. The touch-display functions can be de-activated in the menu.
Wolfgang Rehm

Jack Dahlgren

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #19 on: May 31, 2020, 17:49:52 »

The problem is that when takoing a strong grip to steady a long and heavy lens like the 400mm ED-IF (with a speed-booster= effective 280mm, so still hand-holdable with sensor stabilization), the control wheel is pressed and moves the focus point. When both the   spotmetering + enlarged focus point where the focus ahs been set is moved, reframing  is bound to fail.

On inspecting the bodies in the local photo shop, I found that the Z has a similar suspicious-looking wheel ready to be squashed, as did the panasonic. the only body free of potentially disastrous buttons was the Leitz- Panasonic clone SL2, but that costs twice as much as the Z. 

p.

I use manual lenses, including the 400mm P.C Auto (Similar to your 400) on the Z6 with no issue of turning any control wheels. Your grip for long lenses should be the lens itself, let the camera hang off the back.Even on shorter lenses though I have not inadvertently turned any of the control wheels.

paul hofseth

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2020, 10:12:36 »
yes I agree that heavy lenses should not be suppeorted by the camera alone, but a two-point steadying support is better than one and the body is more stongly squeezed when focussing , especially with the feather-light touch necessary for Nikon Internally focussing optics.  One should have thought that introducing a firmware tweak to allow setting the switches to "do nothing" would have been easy, but Olympus has so far not made any efforts to remedy this fault..

I find that muy heavy Angenieux, Leitz and Zeiss lenses require less of a camera squeeze since their focussing implies a supprorting grip on the lens.

The problem on the pen F is not turning the "wheel", but squeezing it that  activates one of the four switches inside. Touch screens provide no antidote and remain  useless for anyone with less than three arms. On the Pen F they can be turned in so as not to eat batteries and interfere with the actual activity of snapping pictures.

So, furtheer to the thread  theme of "focussing and back buttons" ;can the rear of the Z be made totally immune to any kind of push influencing focussing? -Its front buttons I understand to be harmless  and useful.

p.

Jack Dahlgren

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2020, 18:42:35 »
yes I agree that heavy lenses should not be suppeorted by the camera alone, but a two-point steadying support is better than one and the body is more stongly squeezed when focussing , especially with the feather-light touch necessary for Nikon Internally focussing optics.  One should have thought that introducing a firmware tweak to allow setting the switches to "do nothing" would have been easy, but Olympus has so far not made any efforts to remedy this fault..

I find that muy heavy Angenieux, Leitz and Zeiss lenses require less of a camera squeeze since their focussing implies a supprorting grip on the lens.

The problem on the pen F is not turning the "wheel", but squeezing it that  activates one of the four switches inside. Touch screens provide no antidote and remain  useless for anyone with less than three arms. On the Pen F they can be turned in so as not to eat batteries and interfere with the actual activity of snapping pictures.

So, furtheer to the thread  theme of "focussing and back buttons" ;can the rear of the Z be made totally immune to any kind of push influencing focussing? -Its front buttons I understand to be harmless  and useful.

p.

I'm not sure why you are concerned about focus button pressing when you are using manual focus lenses. There are 10 different buttons/controls + touch screen on the back. All of them can not be turned off. However, it is only the focus point selector which might be a problem for you. You can have it recenter based on a quick press. There is plenty of room on the back of the camera to hold it with the ball of your thumb and not press any buttons. The memory card door has a lump on it which engages the thumb and provides a good grip.

paul hofseth

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2020, 22:10:02 »
Sir,
thanks for considering this exotic conundrum. Usually when I take a photo I do not wish to press any buttons beyond the shutter release-To faff around with various gimmicks while focussing and not being certain of where in the frame the measurement is taken is distracting. I have had several shots ruined for this reason. Almost as evil as constant aujtofocus.-

The focus and spot metering point should stay in the middle, not have to be returned to its proper place while in the process. Worry that a firm grip on the body will shange settings needing additional key presses is the reason I wish to make certain that this can be avoided.

Erik Lund

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Re: Back button focus on mirrorless?
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2020, 19:27:40 »
Here is a link to a similar thread on the same topic


https://nikongear.net/revival/index.php?topic=9576.msg160934#msg160934
Erik Lund