Author Topic: Photographing Lenses  (Read 274 times)

Michael Erlewine

  • Close-Up Photographer
  • NG Supporter
  • **
  • Posts: 1605
  • Close-Up with APO
    • Spirit Grooves
Photographing Lenses
« on: September 12, 2020, 16:03:18 »
I am about to (given time) photograph all my more exotic lenses. I wonder how you would approach this? Shall I focus-stack each lens so we can see as much as possible or are those photos already available and perhaps a more “dreamy” look (shallow depth of field) might be more interesting. And would you rather see the lens off the camera or on the camera, bellows, view camera, etc., where you might commonly use it.

I also probably should put them in a light tent to keep shine and glare to a minimum.

Any suggestions appreciated.

This photo is an example of what I mean by “dreamy,” as in less detailed.
MichaelErlewine.smugmug.com. Founder MacroStop.com, MichaelErlewine.com (articles), https://www.youtube.com/user/merlewine (video tutorials), All-Music Guide, All-Movie Guide, Classic Posters.com, Matrix Software, SpiritGrooves.net, DharmaGrooves.com

Airy

  • NG Supporter
  • **
  • Posts: 2100
    • My pics repository
Re: Photographing Lenses
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2020, 17:53:38 »
As an alternative to that level of perfection, I can only propose a healthy dose of imperfection.

I'd suggest using my ancestor's view camera and Rapid Rectilinear lens. Having a century-plus-old lens depict a modern one :) funny thought. Usually, it is the other way round.

But I'm still waiting for the carborundum powder that I ordered for grinding the glass panes provided by Thomas (thanks again) that would replace the missing matte screen.
Airy Magnien

Jack Dahlgren

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1171
  • You ARE NikonGear
Re: Photographing Lenses
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2020, 18:08:26 »
It comes down to what YOU are interested in doing. I think off the camera is good because it can give prominence to any distinguishing features. Things like aperture and focusing scales, mounts, elements. I would think that you want the portrait of the lens to carry something about the feeling of the lens. Sad you can't take the photo of the lens with itself...

Dr Klaus Schmitt

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 903
Re: Photographing Lenses
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2020, 09:22:10 »
Excellently done!
formerly known as kds315

Ethan

  • NG Supporter
  • **
  • Posts: 176
  • You ARE NikonGear
Re: Photographing Lenses
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2020, 10:05:18 »
I am about to (given time) photograph all my more exotic lenses. I wonder how you would approach this? Shall I focus-stack each lens so we can see as much as possible or are those photos already available and perhaps a more “dreamy” look (shallow depth of field) might be more interesting. And would you rather see the lens off the camera or on the camera, bellows, view camera, etc., where you might commonly use it.

I also probably should put them in a light tent to keep shine and glare to a minimum.

Any suggestions appreciated.

This photo is an example of what I mean by “dreamy,” as in less detailed.

What is the objective to photograph your lenses?

This will determine the best route to follow ranging from a different style to the number of angles for each lens.

Is it for:
- Archiving
- Documentary
- Commercial
- Artistic