Author Topic: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff  (Read 284 times)

Randy Stout

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Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« on: August 21, 2020, 01:34:53 »
This ~9 week old common loon was practicing wing flaps with his sibling on a northern Michigan lake.  Quite entertaining.  For some reasons, the adults rarely will flap towards me, but the juvies have no such aversion.

D850. 600. ISO 280 1/2000s. f/7.1

Cheers

Randy

FredCrowBear

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2020, 04:07:48 »
I always enjoy your loon photos.
Frederick V. Ramsey

Ashlandish

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2020, 06:36:11 »
Me too...
Tim Becraft

Nasos Kosmas

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2020, 14:17:03 »
Me also :)

Randy Stout

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2020, 14:18:18 »
Thanks guys.  Appreciated.  They are wonderful subjects, and captivating to be around.

Hugh_3170

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2020, 14:49:30 »
Me as well!

The full frontal shot is interesting.  With its fat tummy poking forward, the wings seem almost too small for the bird to fly.  It obviously can fly, so I am guessing that they must fly fast.

I always enjoy your loon photos.
Hugh Gunn

Bent Hjarbo

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2020, 17:34:19 »

Randy Stout

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Re: Common Loon Juvie strutting his stuff
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2020, 19:07:57 »
Me as well!

The full frontal shot is interesting.  With its fat tummy poking forward, the wings seem almost too small for the bird to fly.  It obviously can fly, so I am guessing that they must fly fast.

Hugh:  Good observation about the wing size.  They will grow a bit longer before they are flying, but even the adults have the highest wing loading of any flying bird!  And yes, they do fly fast, cruising in the 80-90 mph range (lots of variation in the numbers reported).  This problem is also why they have to work so hard to get airborne.  Often hundreds of yards of running along the water surfacing and flapping for all they are worth to get airborne, and often on a smaller lake they have to circle the lake several times to get enough altitude to clear the tree line.  They also always take off into the wind, they need every bit of lift they can get.  Randy