Author Topic: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?  (Read 72675 times)

pluton

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #315 on: February 25, 2020, 23:37:47 »
Given your set of Nikons, I might be inclined to keep the D750 around, for 2 possible reasons:
1. If you have a lot of shooting you want to do in very bright daylight conditions (think beach, ocean, or snow), the optical finder can provide a pleasant relief from the relatively dim, fixed maximum brightness of the EVF in the otherwise snazzy new Z6.
2. It might be a candidate for IR conversion?
Also, it uses the same batteries as the Z6, which should remain current for many years.
Then again, if the size and bulk of the "big" cameras are proving to be a drag for some uses, maybe sell and look for a super-small but not-plasticky camera such as the new Fuifilm XT-100V or it's recent predecessors.
Keith B., Santa Monica, CA, USA

Jack Dahlgren

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #316 on: February 26, 2020, 01:18:21 »

* What is the use case of the Z6 with the ZF adapter and the traditional lenses? When am i going to want to carry the adapter and lens -- say the 300f4 or 105f2.8 maybe?? Not the 24-120 F4.
* Do i sell the D750? I like it, maybe love it, but again when a I grabbing that vs. the Z ?


I use the adapter whenever I need a focal length and/or aperture which the Z lenses don't cover. The adapter is a bit of a drag when you find it was last used on a lens you have left at home... but generally it is quite useful in allowing a very wide range of lenses.

RobOK

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #317 on: February 26, 2020, 21:08:19 »
Given your set of Nikons, I might be inclined to keep the D750 around, for 2 possible reasons:
1. If you have a lot of shooting you want to do in very bright daylight conditions (think beach, ocean, or snow), the optical finder can provide a pleasant relief from the relatively dim, fixed maximum brightness of the EVF in the otherwise snazzy new Z6.
2. It might be a candidate for IR conversion?
Also, it uses the same batteries as the Z6, which should remain current for many years.
Then again, if the size and bulk of the "big" cameras are proving to be a drag for some uses, maybe sell and look for a super-small but not-plasticky camera such as the new Fuifilm XT-100V or it's recent predecessors.

Ha! I do have a Fuji X-100F and love it! You are right on the Optical viewfinder, sometimes that can't be beat!!

The adapter is a bit of a drag when you find it was last used on a lens you have left at home... but generally it is quite useful in allowing a very wide range of lenses.

HA HA! I have DONE that!  I'm just not used to adapters, maybe I will.... "adapt" to it (pun intended)

Hugh_3170

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #318 on: February 27, 2020, 06:08:04 »
The price of FTZ adapters is falling ~$US120 if you shop around in Melbourne.

Maybe have an FTZ adapter permanently attached to those F-Mount lenses that you frequently use on your Z-Mount bodies?

An extravagance?  No, I think not - given some of the crappy adapters out there without the electronics or quality of fit of the FTZ that are commanding prices that are quite simply not commensurate with their low levels of quality.
Hugh Gunn

Imagelover

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #319 on: February 27, 2020, 19:12:30 »
I have only Nikon "obsolete" digital cameras. From the D70 (bought new in 2008), D300, D3200, D3, D3X and the Df, and I like them all! Not that they all are daily used, only the D3, D3X and Df. I have a lot of the "old" AI and AIS lenses which are often used with those cameras. With the Df I have prepared a camera case containing only pre-AI lenses for use. The lenses are the Micro-Nikkor 55 f/3.5, 28 f/3.5, 50 f/2, Nikkor-P-C Auto 105 f/2.5, Nikkor-Q Auto 135 f/2.8, Nikkor-H-C 85 f/1.8. Nikkor-Q-C Auto 135 f/3.5 and the Nikkor-Q 200 f/4. I'm just waiting for better  weather conditions. To me there are no cameras to be called "obsolete". To you that have used the D70 with good Nikon lenses and a tripod: I really think that the D70 in most cases are good enough! Enjoy your photography with the equipment you have and take great images!
One picture taken is far better than none!

MILLIREHM

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #320 on: February 27, 2020, 20:15:41 »
I have only Nikon "obsolete" digital cameras. From the D70 (bought new in 2008), D300, D3200, D3, D3X and the Df, and I like them all!

Besides no Nikon being obsolete I would not count the Df as "obsolete" it is still sold new and not listed out.
Wolfgang Rehm

MILLIREHM

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #321 on: February 27, 2020, 20:21:31 »

Maybe have an FTZ adapter permanently attached to those F-Mount lenses that you frequently use on your Z-Mount bodies?


I bought a second FTZ adapter for being permanently attached to my 10 mm f/5,6 OP-Fisheye while carrying it in the bag
(A bit off topic here nevertheless)
Wolfgang Rehm

the solitaire

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #322 on: March 09, 2020, 21:18:20 »
I wouldn't wantto call this one obsolete. I mean, it is not the latest model. It's not even mirrorless, but it has all th eimportant features. One can set Aperture and shutter speed. It has a dial to remind one of the ISO speed, and it even has a self-timer, and a mirror up function. That is like mirrorless, with a mirror!

Shot a roll of Velvia 100

DSC_0092 by b j, on Flickr
Buddy

Eskil Sorensen

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #323 on: March 12, 2020, 14:14:32 »
I enjoy this Obsolete Camera-conversation. So many nice pictures. It shows us, that there is not THAT much difference between a 10 year old camera and an entirely new camera. Thanks for some great contributions!

Nasos Kosmas

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #324 on: March 12, 2020, 20:15:11 »
I enjoy this Obsolete Camera-conversation. So many nice pictures. It shows us, that there is not THAT much difference between a 10 year old camera and an entirely new camera. Thanks for some great contributions!
You are right, I compared some daylight photos from my D70  and D750 and after almost 14years  not so much  difference  8)

KenP

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #325 on: March 29, 2020, 18:49:01 »
Currently reading a book about color, lines and patterns in photography. The lesson was to go shoot color but had to exclude nature and landscapes. After about 15m of wandering around, I ended up in the garage. The blower is two years old but still quite clean. Shot with D2h and 17-55 Lens. This is the only digital camera I own. For me, it is good enough.


BruceSD

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #326 on: March 30, 2020, 21:13:49 »
.
KenP, the photo that you posted of your red snowblower is a beautiful example of the rich and vibrant colors one can get out of older CCD sensor cameras!

I've sold my Nikon D810 and D610 cameras and replaced them with D80 and D200 CCD cameras.

Why?  I find that 10MP (megapixels) are largely sufficient for my work.  Second, I greatly prefer the color that I get out of these older CCD sensor cameras.

Why do I think the color is better with these older CCD cameras?  Not being an optical engineer I can only speculate.   The height of CCD development for digital SLR cameras was 2006 - 2010.   After that, most camera manufacturers made their new models with CMOS sensors. 

What's the difference?  Well, the inner workings of the sensors themselves are quite different.  Some will claim that the inherent differences between CCD and CMOS alone do not account for the difference in color fidelity.  However, in addition to the sensor itself changing, the CFA sitting on top of it also changed.  I suspect the unique color profile I see in my D200 and D80 are largely controled by the CFA and the sensor working together.  I have to believe that the CFA must have changed significantly during the CCD to CMOS transition.

Anyway, I have found that for whatever reason, I prefer the CCD colors from 2006 - 2010 vintage cameras over the more modern CMOS cameras.  While the highest MP CCD camera Nikon made was 10MP, please be aware that Sony made three models (A350, A380, & A390) with 14MB CCD sensors.  I own a Sony A350 and find the colors it produces are quite similar to the D200 and D80.  All else being equal, I'm probably going to end up shooting more with the 14MP Sony than the 10MP Nikons just to get those extra MPs.

Do you see any difference in the color in the images taken with your CCD and CMOS sensors?
.




CS

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #327 on: March 30, 2020, 22:16:32 »
.
KenP, the photo that you posted of your red snowblower is a beautiful example of the rich and vibrant colors one can get out of older CCD sensor cameras!

I've sold my Nikon D810 and D610 cameras and replaced them with D80 and D200 CCD cameras.

Why?  I find that 10MP (megapixels) are largely sufficient for my work.  Second, I greatly prefer the color that I get out of these older CCD sensor cameras.

Why do I think the color is better with these older CCD cameras?  Not being an optical engineer I can only speculate.   The height of CCD development for digital SLR cameras was 2006 - 2010.   After that, most camera manufacturers made their new models with CMOS sensors. 

What's the difference?  Well, the inner workings of the sensors themselves are quite different.  Some will claim that the inherent differences between CCD and CMOS alone do not account for the difference in color fidelity.  However, in addition to the sensor itself changing, the CFA sitting on top of it also changed.  I suspect the unique color profile I see in my D200 and D80 are largely controled by the CFA and the sensor working together.  I have to believe that the CFA must have changed significantly during the CCD to CMOS transition.

Anyway, I have found that for whatever reason, I prefer the CCD colors from 2006 - 2010 vintage cameras over the more modern CMOS cameras.  While the highest MP CCD camera Nikon made was 10MP, please be aware that Sony made three models (A350, A380, & A390) with 14MB CCD sensors.  I own a Sony A350 and find the colors it produces are quite similar to the D200 and D80.  All else being equal, I'm probably going to end up shooting more with the 14MP Sony than the 10MP Nikons just to get those extra MPs.
.

Yeahbut, I recall that color rendition, and particularly with reds, from my D200 was dependent on which software I used for editing my NEFs. Nikon SW was best at the reds, but I much preferred the Adobe workflow. Plus, I don't miss CF cards after bending a pin on my expensive SanDisk Extreme IV card reader.  :(
Carl

KenP

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #328 on: March 31, 2020, 17:20:50 »
Interesting observations Bruce. I am not well versed enough nor do I have the experience in photography to discern the subtleties between sensors. In my short time with photography, I have used a Nikon D200 (stopped working), a Nikon D2x (sold) and a Nikon V1 (failed electronics). For whatever reason, I have become comfortable with the D2h. This is just a hobby when time allows for me. I have printed up to 13X19 on the D2h quite nicely. I try and fill the frame the best I can to avoid cropping as there is an obvious limit to 4mp. It is for the most part my color camera. I have an old Pentax screw mount Spotmatic to shoot black and white film for which I have just started exploring. Would like to process and print on my own at some point.

golunvolo

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Re: Do you still use an "obsolete" camera?
« Reply #329 on: April 02, 2020, 23:53:54 »
D300, impressed with the quality and reliability today with the flash and colors

  D300, 35mm 1.8 dx