Author Topic: Grass  (Read 3426 times)

Björn Carlén

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Grass
« on: August 22, 2015, 22:22:12 »
I suppose this is no website for determining botanical species, but I'll take the chance. This grass and its flowers were found in mid Sweden, some 800 meters above sea level, adjacent to a small creek by about 20 cm. Could someone tell me what it is?
Shot with the CV 40/2 and its close-up lens, by the way.
Björn Carlén
Huddinge, Sweden

Fons Baerken

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Re: Grass
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2015, 14:17:50 »
A sedge

Carex grayi

Björn Carlén

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Re: Grass
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2015, 19:15:25 »
A sedge

Carex grayi

Thank you, Fons Baerken!
Björn Carlén
Huddinge, Sweden

Bjørn Rørslett

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Re: Grass
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2015, 19:33:58 »
Nope. This is typical Carex flava.

I try to be of assistance with identification of most species, at least those of a European origin. One cannot cover everything though.

Björn Carlén

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Re: Grass
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2015, 23:39:13 »
Thanks, Bjørn!
I realize now the question should rather have been posted under "Help desk". I've got some more plants to ask about.
Björn Carlén
Huddinge, Sweden

elsa hoffmann

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Re: Grass
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2015, 01:46:55 »
Bjorn - you have come to the right place for plants :)
There are many enthusiasts and some very intelligent others :)
"You don’t take a photograph – you make it” – Ansel Adams. Thats why I use photoshop.
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www.elsa.co.za. www.intimateimages.co.za

Björn Carlén

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Re: Grass
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2015, 09:09:04 »
Bjorn - you have come to the right place for plants :)
There are many enthusiasts and some very intelligent others :)
Sounds very good, Elsa!
Björn Carlén
Huddinge, Sweden

Fons Baerken

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Re: Grass
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2015, 10:31:06 »
Carex flava or yellow sedge appears to be an endangered species, i was rather quick with my nomenclature.

C.grayi is a commercial species originally from the us.

This may it, i have it on pot



In all Carex is a vast family looking in my European wild flowers book lists already some 30 different types.

Bjørn Rørslett

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Re: Grass
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2015, 11:40:26 »
Carex is indeed a large genus and in the Nordic region alone there probably are about 120 species, increasing to near 200 for Europe as a whole. Not all of them can be identified from pictures alone, though, but I try to do my best. This genus is prominent in coastal or upland regions and some species in fact by their abundance contribute to shape the landscape so important to be familiar with the commoner ones.

C. flava
is the type for the Flava section and these tend to be very complex to identify even with the specimen in hand. Fortunately, C. flava itself isn't equally difficult to come to grasp with  as are its allies.

Björn Carlén

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Re: Grass
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2015, 12:10:24 »
Carex flava or yellow sedge appears to be an endangered species, i was rather quick with my nomenclature.
Strange – when I look it up in the web flora, it's listed as common, at least in our country. It's the C. lepidocarpa that's rare.
Björn Carlén
Huddinge, Sweden

Bjørn Rørslett

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Re: Grass
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2015, 12:25:32 »
Fons is located in The Netherlands ... That explains a lot concerning assessment of species rarity ...

C. lepidocarpa, and several others of the related species, are indeed rare in the Nordic countries. C. tumidicarpa and C. oederi  (C. serotina) are very common, C. flava is in between as it is common only on richer calcareous soils.