Author Topic: My IR Setup  (Read 244 times)

BruceSD

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My IR Setup
« on: October 29, 2022, 22:38:47 »
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I recently purchased an IR converted Nikon D200 digital camera.  I believe that it's conversion was done by Life Pixel using their more popular 720 nm process.

I also have a Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 K non-Ai lens (serial no 267510) that Birna has rated as exceptional for IR.

Did some testing this afternoon.  The optimum aperture for sharpness near to far is f/11.   

I got a nice sun star (first photo).  Also, even with a lens hood, it seems to flare easily (second photo). 

I am pleased with this IR kit, plenty sharp with nice contrast.   

Birna Rørslett

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Re: My IR Setup
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2022, 10:42:21 »
Most lenses flare easily in IR as the lens coatings are not designed for handling out-of-visible light. You just have to work around the problem, or use it for pictorial effects.

Do note that digital IR tends to come out quite "flat" and dull, entirely unlike the (false) impression we got from the old Kodak IR film. While the Kodak "IR" with blocked shadows and glowing highlights was incorrect, and digital IR is more true, we still need to post-process to give a more pleasant rendition of the scene.

Using an R72 filter the sky will rarely go entirely black in IR if you shoot near populated areas. This is due to aerial dust and contamination. Thus balance the gradation against vegetation instead.

BruceSD

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Re: My IR Setup
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2022, 17:19:59 »

Do note that digital IR tends to come out quite "flat" and dull, entirely unlike the (false) impression we got from the old Kodak IR film. While the Kodak "IR" with blocked shadows and glowing highlights was incorrect, and digital IR is more true, we still need to post-process to give a more pleasant rendition of the scene.


Birna, thank you for the advice.  The photos I posted above were JPGs out of camera with minimal post processing.  Indeed, they do look flat and dull.   The next batch of IR photos I take I'll be sure to use the RAW files and will work them over a bit in post to see if I can make them more vibrant and 3D like.

golunvolo

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Re: My IR Setup
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2022, 19:20:48 »
I also have a modified D200 with 720nm filter. It is such fun camera to use. I pair it, mostly, with a 18-70mm 3.5-5.6 as the body  has the af corrected to work with this lens. The images are tack sharp, especially if stoped down to f8. I have found the 70-300mm vr to be very usefull in ir as well. Plenty of examples with this and other lenses-bodies combinations here in NG.

  Have fun and do share, please!


Erik Lund

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Re: My IR Setup
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2022, 14:26:16 »
Welcome to the club! I also have an old D200 that I converted many years ago.

Yes a very nice camera to explore [IR] images.

I have now also a Nikon Z6 and I love the possibility to shoot full frame and with the ability to nail focus on all lenses albeit a bit slow process, but it works.

Now banding is a bit of challenge sometimes,,,

My ancient 28mm f/3.5 K version got an Ai-P CPU, it's indeed one of the sharpest and gives images with good contrast.

In this thread i have posted some [IR] images with the above lens as well as a bunch of other Nikkor lenses ;)

https://nikongear.net/revival/index.php?topic=10495.0
Erik Lund