Author Topic: Run a 16 bit Install Program on 64 bit Windows 10 (Is this possible?)  (Read 480 times)

David H. Hartman

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2683
  • I Doctor Photographs... :)
That said, I've had little trouble with running very old programs on Windows 10 Enterprise. With a modest amount of hacking even most 16 bit programs can be made to run acceptably with no ill effects on the OS.

Can a 32 bit program with a 16 bit install be run on Windows 10 64 bit? If so where can I find instructions on how to do this?

I've used for years a program called File Sync (maybe FSync.exe) from Fileware England, designed for Windows 95 and updated perhaps up to Window 98 SE or perhaps Windows XP. The program uses a simple to understand interface dating back to Windows 95. It can be used to sync or contribute files from one drive or folder, source to target. It can do a bit mapped compare of files. Used with some skill it's fairly easy to synchronize a target from a source without over-writing a good file on the target with a corrupt one on the source. It can be used to contribute new files to the target without deleting needed files on that target. I find the interface easy to understand and easy to avoid deadly mistakes.

The newer programs (sync/contribute programs) I've tried as have complex interfaces that make it easy to brainlessly sync folders deleting needed files and or over-writing good files with corrupted ones.

The only way I know to use Fsync.exe (Fileware England) in 64 bit Windows 10 is install the program in an early Windows 7 OS and then update that Windows 7 OS to Windows 10. At a point of update the install program for Fsync.exe fails to run on Windows 7.

Any help, especially links to a step by step guide to running a 16 bit install program on a 64 bit Windows 10 OS. Are there any utilities that allow running a 16 bit install program on 64 bit Windows 10?

The program itself, Fsync.exe (Fileware England) runs almost flawlessly on Windows 10 64 bit. If a drive or folder contains too may files to copy it may take 2 or 3 passes but other than that it's efficient and safe. The help feature don't work but I don't need it.

Thank you for considering this!

Dave
Beatniks are out to make it rich
Oh no, must be the season of the witch!

Chris Betson

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 67
  • General Mr fixit and grumpy old bugger
    • Octarine Services
Sorry - can't help as  I dumped Windoze years ago for Linux - but generally 64 bit operating systems won't play with other than 64 bit programs.

MILLIREHM

  • NG Supporter
  • **
  • Posts: 716
  • Vienna, Austria
The only way I can think of this working currently is running a Virtual Machine with an old operating system installed
Wolfgang Rehm

mxbianco

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 646
  • A teddy bear from the Alps, rarely fierce
The only way I can think of this working currently is running a Virtual Machine with an old operating system installed

Agree, try VMware Player (it has a free fully functional version), then install Win XP in the virtual machine, then share the drives from the W10 machine and map them on the XP machine as network resources (drive D: E: F: ... Z:). At this point you can install your software in the XP machine and work with the mapped drives as if they were local drives, with the added benefit that you can see partitions greater than 2TB on the XP machine.

Ciao from Massimo
Since evolution has given us TWO ears and ONE mouth, we are supposed (me included) to be doing more listening than talking.

ThomasAdams

  • NG Supporter
  • **
  • Posts: 109
  • You ARE NikonGear
David,

 I have some older programs that I have run in VM (Virtual Box by Oracle) by creating a machine and installing an OS as has been suggested. Once I get one setup I create a clone of it and use only the clones for testing which I later delete. This has worked for much of what I do, however sometimes access to non-virtualized hardware or hardware offered via the virtualized machine interface and application presents a problem. I have tried NTVDM on a couple of occasions with windows 10 32 bit OS (rare) with some success. If you have Windows 10 32bit, search for and run Turn windows features On or Off and locate Legacy Components click to show children and then check NTVDM then click OK to enable 16 bit support.

Regards,
Tom

David H. Hartman

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2683
  • I Doctor Photographs... :)
I wonder if it's painless to upgrade Windows 10 32 bit to Windows 10 64 bit. I've read about turning no 16 bit support on Windows 32 bit but not 64 bit.

Windows 7 as installed in late 2014 would run 16 bit programs just as installed. Once installed the program Fsync.exe from Fileware England once installed was good to got. An upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10 didn't interrupt Fsync.exe. The help files don't work but I don't need them.

If I build a new Windows 10 box I'll have to start with Windows 7 or Windows 10 32 bit and upgrade to Windows 10 64 bit.

If I could figure out what files need to be where and could backup the registry entries needed but I'd need to be more than a "Power User" to do that.

Thanks to everyone! The Quest continues.

Dave
Beatniks are out to make it rich
Oh no, must be the season of the witch!

Chris Betson

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 67
  • General Mr fixit and grumpy old bugger
    • Octarine Services
FreeFileSync works on Linux and I believe Windoze - have you tried it?

David H. Hartman

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2683
  • I Doctor Photographs... :)
FreeFileSync works on Linux and I believe Windoze - have you tried it?

I've tried FreeFileSync but its interface is complex and it seems dangerous in that it's easy to accidentally sync a folder which will delete a file from the target that was accidentally deleted from the source. It will also happily over-write a good file with a corrupted file.

I'm used to the old Fsync.exe and do not allow it to delete or over-write files. When I get a list of files that are not equal I can check the source and target file to determine the reason these files aren't equal. At that point I can over-write of rename the target file and keep both.

Dave

A true file sync is dangerous and should not be confused with an archive. I need several more HD(s) for proper archives. I'm sure there have been discussions here at NG about the dangers of using a sync program v. a proper archive.  
Beatniks are out to make it rich
Oh no, must be the season of the witch!

ThomasAdams

  • NG Supporter
  • **
  • Posts: 109
  • You ARE NikonGear
David,

 I have used many similar programs as well as FreeFileSync, I have been using AllWay Sync for years (decade +) along with custom removable HDD's, servers and NAS units. While it can be a bit complex (like FreeFileSync) to setup initially, it is extremely useful and allows customization to provide one way sync, one way copy, 2 way synchronizations as well as the ability to back up a source directory to 2 devices simultaneously. You can also choose how changed/deleted files are handled; remove permanently, move to Recycle Bin, move to _SYNAPP Folder or user defined location. Additionally you can choose the file retention of those modified/deleted files along with how many version to retain. What is nice is that you can enable/disable these for each "Job" and then clone the job to create a new job with a few modifications of options if you desire. Typically, I don't use real-time syncing, but that option is also available. Another feature I really like is the ability to export/import jobs and program settings to get you up and running if you have issues. They have a free version that only limits the number of files you can sync, but it is worth a try. I would suggest working with a small batch of files to get things set up and test if you decide to give it a try. I have the pro version as well as the portable version I keep on portable drives.

 I'd be willing to create some settings for you to test if you provide some info on what you'd like to do or any special criteria. It doesn't take long and I can tell you right away if there is a program limitation that would prevent you from doing something. As a side note, I am not paid by the company nor offered any compensation, free software or kickbacks.

Read more here: https://allwaysync.com/?a=1

 I am sure you know that there are hazards to using unsupported software for backup purposes, I know it is hard to let go of programs you have been accustomed to. I'd really hate to see you lose important data and I'd feel bad if I didn't at least attempt to encourage you to explore alternatives.

Regards,
Tom

Birna Rørslett

  • Global Moderator
  • **
  • Posts: 3549
  • A lesser fierce bear of the North
Run a 64-bit Linux system and install virtual machines (VM) on it. Then you can run almost everything there, including very old OS, even MS-DOS if you really want to explore the past and bygone era :).   I'm using VMs to run some needed legacy software myself, by the way.

There is no problem mapping drives inside the virtual machine and access your local network.

jag

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • You ARE NikonGear
Re: Run a 16 bit Install Program on 64 bit Windows 10 (Is this possible?)
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2021, 12:34:53 »
There is a compatibility setting for running (older) programs in Win10.
Right Click setup.exe, and look for something like "Troubleshoot Compatibility", sorry I have noe English Win10, the exact text is unknown to me...
Have you tried this?

Edit.
Or maybe your answer is here, https://www.groovypost.com/howto/enable-16-bit-application-support-windows-10/

/Jan

David H. Hartman

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2683
  • I Doctor Photographs... :)
Re: Run a 16 bit Install Program on 64 bit Windows 10 (Is this possible?)
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2021, 18:52:19 »
I'm not so much interested in exploring the passed as I want to install the vintage Windows 95 - 98 SE Fsync.exe as it allows me to maintain backups without the danger of accidentally "Syncing" a target drive and over-writing good files with corrupt ones or deleting files on files on the target that were accidentally deleted from the source.

Dave

---

I was hoping someone knew of a Silver Bullet.  :)
Beatniks are out to make it rich
Oh no, must be the season of the witch!

Bob Foster

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
  • You ARE NikonGear
Re: Run a 16 bit Install Program on 64 bit Windows 10 (Is this possible?)
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2021, 20:32:58 »
David--- No silver bullet!

The problem is the CPU, it won't natively execute a 16 bit program.. Yes, it's possible with control of the OS manifest and use of MS Fondue to build a crude emulator using much of the old Virtual XP mode.

It's much easier to use dosbox for DOS and Windows 3.1.1.

As you want to run a program designed for W95, W98, and W98SE VMware is the way to go.

FWIW, I prefer to deal with backup/sync manually. For Windows I use a program called Beyond Compare that can be set to check the integrity of your backups. I have one online and three offline backups. One of the offline backups is to a box running the Free BSD OS. There I use ftp for file transfer.

Bob

David H. Hartman

  • NG Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2683
  • I Doctor Photographs... :)
Re: Run a 16 bit Install Program on 64 bit Windows 10 (Is this possible?)
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2021, 23:43:06 »
Bob,

Thank you. I'll have to try Beyond Compare. It looks someone like the program I've been using. It also runs on Windows and MAC which is a plus.

Dave
Beatniks are out to make it rich
Oh no, must be the season of the witch!