Author Topic: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon  (Read 523 times)

Dr Klaus Schmitt

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UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« on: July 30, 2021, 18:51:40 »
Bitterroot - Lewisia cotyledon in human vision, reflected UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (Left to right, top to bottom)

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Birna Rørslett

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2021, 21:39:50 »
A very nice presentatrion.

I had to look up the genus s it was unfamiliar to me.

Bill De Jager

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2021, 17:57:38 »
Nice work, Klaus.

Birna, this is one of the choice native genera in western North America.  Many cultivars of this particular species exist.  Lewisia rediviva or bitterroot gives its name to a number of places in the American west. 

Birna Rørslett

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2021, 18:41:01 »
I gleaned as much from my reading .... Would not have thought it belonged to the Montiaceae until I saw it in print!! European members of that family are small inconspicious herbs.

Dr Klaus Schmitt

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2021, 00:34:33 »
Thanks guys! Those appeared a few years ago on the market and I bought some for my balcony.
A very well blossoming succulent, makes it through the winter outside even and starts blooming
early in spring; comes in orange, pink, whitish and striped versions - very pretty and decorative.
Was surprised about that UV pattern it has - bees and bumble bees get crazy about it...
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Wannabebetter

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2021, 06:33:32 »
New to me, as well. It wouldn't be too great a stretch to assert, I'd seen 'em all. Clearly, I haven't. Truly stellar images -- I long for the day, I produce nearly as good.

Dr Klaus Schmitt

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2021, 15:54:21 »
New to me, as well. It wouldn't be too great a stretch to assert, I'd seen 'em all. Clearly, I haven't. Truly stellar images -- I long for the day, I produce nearly as good.

Thanks. You certainly will, comes wih practise and more experience! ;-)
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Bill De Jager

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2021, 17:35:01 »
Thanks guys! Those appeared a few years ago on the market and I bought some for my balcony.
A very well blossoming succulent, makes it through the winter outside even and starts blooming
early in spring; comes in orange, pink, whitish and striped versions - very pretty and decorative.
Was surprised about that UV pattern it has - bees and bumble bees get crazy about it...

In its native habitat L. cotyledon can grow up to elevations of 2300 meters, in a region where annual precipitation averages 1200-3000 mm (much as snow) and temperatures can get well below freezing in winter even in valley bottoms, at least away from the coastline.  This is in one corner of California*, a place which doesn't have a reputation for such things.

*and nearby parts of the U.S. state of Oregon

Dr Klaus Schmitt

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Re: UV Nikkor 105mm does Lewisia cotyledon
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2021, 10:46:19 »
In its native habitat L. cotyledon can grow up to elevations of 2300 meters, in a region where annual precipitation averages 1200-3000 mm (much as snow) and temperatures can get well below freezing in winter even in valley bottoms, at least away from the coastline.  This is in one corner of California*, a place which doesn't have a reputation for such things.

*and nearby parts of the U.S. state of Oregon

Thanks, I had read this too. No wonder they grow well here and already brought a few through our German winter (not that cold, but wet).
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