Author Topic: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work  (Read 2206 times)

MEPER

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2021, 22:03:27 »
A simple Joby could also be the answer?
Especially if you use lighter lenses like 50 - 150 mm macros.
Also if you have a hand on the camera while shooting the Joby can be a good support.
The advantage is that it is very light and easy to setup and can adapt to many uneven surfaces......

pluton

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2021, 20:05:04 »
Once you get this low I wonder if a bean bag, or an old sock, would suffice.
There's a bag for that:https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/products/Counter-Chest-Strap-Pods/ci/10834/N/4075788766?filters=fct_brand_name%3Avisual-departures
Unlike beans, they are unaffected by water(plastic bead stuffing) and unlike sand, they are not heavy.
Keith B., Santa Monica, CA, USA

Bob Foster

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #32 on: February 24, 2021, 04:58:10 »
When I see something on or close to the ground that I want to photograph, more often than not it is small; therefore, I’ll make a close-up or perhaps a macro shot. If I elect to stack images in this scenario, I’ve found that I spend less time repairing the artifacts left by any/all of the stacking programs if I use the most rigid set-up that I’ve found.

The Sachtler DA 100 K (not available in carbon fiber) has proven, for me, a real asset.

It has no click stops that can force you to raise the tripod higher than you want. The legs will spread to a full 90 degrees, the spikes are functional at that angle.

This tripod is rigid. When I’m in a reasonably sheltered spot (out of, or able to effectively shield the set-up from the wind) and tolerably firm earth upon which to place the tripod is available I’ve used a Cambo Actus XL 35 (or Ultima ) with a D850 on the rear standard and a heavy lens on the front standard (6.5 to 8Kg). I’ve obtained high quality images without resort to a pentapod or other form of improved support.

If the tripod has been in the mud, slime or sand cleanup is quick and easy- remove the head (or flat plate) then rinse the bowl and legs clean under running water. In a pinch I’ve swirled the tripod in a pond.

Bob

Snoogly

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #33 on: February 24, 2021, 05:27:35 »
Thanks for your ideas everyone. They ranged from cheap and basic to eye-wateringly expensive!

But going back to my original question about a tripod that can be used both for normal use and macro use, close to the ground, I plumped for this one. Splay the legs for low level horizontal work, and invert the center column for looking down at 90 degrees. It’s the looking directly down functionality that I really wanted.

https://www.3leggedthing.com/corey

It ticks all the boxes! And it’s relatively cheap, after VAT was deducted.

But I also bought one of Akira’s red balls and some of his small black legs :-) They are just too charming to resist.

Erik Lund

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #34 on: February 24, 2021, 10:34:00 »
When I see something on or close to the ground that I want to photograph, more often than not it is small; therefore, I’ll make a close-up or perhaps a macro shot. If I elect to stack images in this scenario, I’ve found that I spend less time repairing the artifacts left by any/all of the stacking programs if I use the most rigid set-up that I’ve found.

The Sachtler DA 100 K (not available in carbon fiber) has proven, for me, a real asset.

It has no click stops that can force you to raise the tripod higher than you want. The legs will spread to a full 90 degrees, the spikes are functional at that angle.

This tripod is rigid. When I’m in a reasonably sheltered spot (out of, or able to effectively shield the set-up from the wind) and tolerably firm earth upon which to place the tripod is available I’ve used a Cambo Actus XL 35 (or Ultima ) with a D850 on the rear standard and a heavy lens on the front standard (6.5 to 8Kg). I’ve obtained high quality images without resort to a pentapod or other form of improved support.

If the tripod has been in the mud, slime or sand cleanup is quick and easy- remove the head (or flat plate) then rinse the bowl and legs clean under running water. In a pinch I’ve swirled the tripod in a pond.

Bob
Very nice setup, the color combination is clean and very striking! Super product shot as well ;)
Erik Lund

Akira

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2021, 11:08:56 »
Thanks for your ideas everyone. They ranged from cheap and basic to eye-wateringly expensive!

But going back to my original question about a tripod that can be used both for normal use and macro use, close to the ground, I plumped for this one. Splay the legs for low level horizontal work, and invert the center column for looking down at 90 degrees. It’s the looking directly down functionality that I really wanted.

https://www.3leggedthing.com/corey

It ticks all the boxes! And it’s relatively cheap, after VAT was deducted.

But I also bought one of Akira’s red balls and some of his small black legs :-) They are just too charming to resist.

Good to know you found the solution.  Hope you enjoy your new rig!
"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

"Limitation is inspiration." - Akira

Bob Foster

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2021, 23:18:31 »
Snoogly- I'm glad that you've found something that will fell your requirements.

Erik- thanks for the comment on the image.

Bob

Steven P.

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #37 on: February 26, 2021, 05:13:49 »
At the right time, you can get one for peanuts.
I am a happy user of a Gitzo explorer tripod. Mine is the 4 section, series 2. For a regular tripod it is a compromise if you are over 5 feet tall.
For small, as close to ground, most contorted position, angle it anywhere, there is nothing like it. I never use it fully extended. It is the only tripod that actually fits on one of those silly backpack mounts.

Kim Pilegaard

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #38 on: October 19, 2021, 08:48:33 »
When I see something on or close to the ground that I want to photograph, more often than not it is small; therefore, I’ll make a close-up or perhaps a macro shot. If I elect to stack images in this scenario, I’ve found that I spend less time repairing the artifacts left by any/all of the stacking programs if I use the most rigid set-up that I’ve found.

The Sachtler DA 100 K (not available in carbon fiber) has proven, for me, a real asset.

It has no click stops that can force you to raise the tripod higher than you want. The legs will spread to a full 90 degrees, the spikes are functional at that angle.

This tripod is rigid. When I’m in a reasonably sheltered spot (out of, or able to effectively shield the set-up from the wind) and tolerably firm earth upon which to place the tripod is available I’ve used a Cambo Actus XL 35 (or Ultima ) with a D850 on the rear standard and a heavy lens on the front standard (6.5 to 8Kg). I’ve obtained high quality images without resort to a pentapod or other form of improved support.

If the tripod has been in the mud, slime or sand cleanup is quick and easy- remove the head (or flat plate) then rinse the bowl and legs clean under running water. In a pinch I’ve swirled the tripod in a pond.

Bob

Very nice setup. How do you fit the Burzynski head to the tripod?
Kim

Birna Rørslett

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #39 on: October 19, 2021, 10:41:44 »
A big washer and a 3/8" bolt from below is the usual remedy. That is what I use with my Burzynski heads. In some cases it was possible to repurpose parts from  flash setup for my old Nikonos. For near-ground work and on ice, I use cut-down Sachtlers fortified with additional spikes in stainless steel.

The Sacthlers work well under water, but it is important to rinse them thoroughly if used in sea water. Once in a while, add some protective oil to the screws as they will rust over time if the tripod is often submerged.

Bruno Schroder

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #40 on: October 19, 2021, 11:19:16 »
My Burzynski head came with a short bolt.
Quick snap from the inside of the tripod (ENG 2 CF, 100mm bowl).
Bruno Schröder

Birna Rørslett

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #41 on: October 19, 2021, 13:11:32 »
This is the anchoring on my travel Sachtler to keep the Burzynski fixed rock solid to the tripod.

The spare part from my old Nikonos gear serves as the washer as well. The brushed aluminium doesn't being into water either.

I do have flatter setups on other Sachtlers, but the one here is easily taken apart when I put the tripod into airline luggage.

Kim Pilegaard

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Re: Seeking advice about a tripod ideal for low-level work
« Reply #42 on: October 19, 2021, 14:59:52 »
Thanks Birna and Bruno. It seems to be a very sturdy solution!
Kim