Author Topic: Nikon F2 AS ready for pano shooting  (Read 519 times)

Nasos Kosmas

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Re: Nikon F2 AS ready for pano shooting
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2020, 16:32:13 »
Amazing mechanical camera still working excellent for me some times i removed the finder and  made photos lower in the ground focusing through the ground glass like an old 6x6 camera ;)
I ve got a nice series with BW Agfa Scala film slide
Its interesting how I got the DP 12 finder, I trade it for the original non photometer finder cause it was faulty
someone force it to open and it separated in two pieces so four wires was hanging with no contact internally ;D I found where to solder after some guess work and it was new again!

Stories from the past in the digital age

MFloyd

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Re: Nikon F2 AS ready for pano shooting
« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2020, 17:50:19 »
Nikon F2 AS
Camera of Reid Turner Blackburn, discovered after the 1980 eruption of Mount St Helen. With the DS-12 EE Aperture Control and 250 magazine (I never had).

https://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/nikonf2/accessories/ds12/index.htm
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Hans_S

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Re: Nikon F2 AS ready for pano shooting
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2020, 00:42:05 »
A quick look at eBay showed several DP-12 finders for $379.00 (USD) or so.
Dave

Dave, the problem with second-hand DP12's is that they too may have well worn resistor rings. These rings seem to be the Achilles heel of the DP12, mine has had two replaced. When it last worked, the flickering exposure display indicated that the current ring was on its way out too. Sover Wong offers replacement rings that claims to be much longer lived. Unfortunately my local repair guy who had access to upgraded rings has retired.

Early in my career I spent a lot of time cleaning the contacts of PCB's in mainframe computers with an ink eraser and isopropyl alcohol...I learnt early on that the dodgiest part of anything electric were the contacts! My camera has been scrubbed clean and a voltmeter tells me that the juice is available at the top pins...so the fault must be in the DP12 itself.

In the first five years of this camera's life it had the shutter rebuilt twice, fortunately the first was during warranty, the second was a big $$$ affair  :o :o