Author Topic: FTZ limitations: Aperture lever  (Read 1214 times)

Per Inge Oestmoen

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Re: FTZ limitations: Aperture lever
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2019, 02:43:58 »
The FTZ adapter has no aperture lever. One is forced to use old Nikon MF lenses, or brand new Zeiss lenses, in stopped-down mode.
This is a mixed blessing (ahem):
+ when focussing a stopped down lens, focus shift is no longer an issue, but
- accuracy of focus is less, and
- the EVF needs more amplification, which may lead to a degradation of the image in dark places, again making the focus more difficult
- no aperture info is provided in the EXIF or in the viewfinder


The last and next to last drawbacks are two of three reasons why I refrain from buying a Z model. The image degradation when the EVF amplifies its signal is really significant, and comes in addition to the fact that the EVF cannot compete with an OVF to start with.

Some purists will likely interject that EXIF data are not necessary and that one should concentrate on image content and forget about technical data. To this, I strongly disagree and see no reason why one should throw away a true advantage to digital camera technology. I consider the image degradation caused by the stop down metering the decisive reason why I stay away from the mirrorless offerings, though. Also important is the much shortened battery life.

On balance, I find no really weighty reasons to go mirrorless unless video use is paramount.

Per Inge Oestmoen, Norway
"Noise reduction is just another word for image destruction"

Per Inge Oestmoen

Jack Dahlgren

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Re: FTZ limitations: Aperture lever
« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2019, 07:34:03 »


The last and next to last drawbacks are two of three reasons why I refrain from buying a Z model. The image degradation when the EVF amplifies its signal is really significant, and comes in addition to the fact that the EVF cannot compete with an OVF to start with.

Some purists will likely interject that EXIF data are not necessary and that one should concentrate on image content and forget about technical data. To this, I strongly disagree and see no reason why one should throw away a true advantage to digital camera technology. I consider the image degradation caused by the stop down metering the decisive reason why I stay away from the mirrorless offerings, though. Also important is the much shortened battery life.

On balance, I find no really weighty reasons to go mirrorless unless video use is paramount.

Per Inge Oestmoen, Norway

Per,
Have you tried the Z6? Image magnification in the viewfinder is a significant advantage of mirrorless technology. Focusing Z6 with manual lenses is far superior to my other camera (Df) even in low light. It takes so time to get accustomed to the different way of working, but I find it hard to go back to optical finder now.

golunvolo

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Re: FTZ limitations: Aperture lever
« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2019, 09:41:53 »


The last and next to last drawbacks are two of three reasons why I refrain from buying a Z model. The image degradation when the EVF amplifies its signal is really significant, and comes in addition to the fact that the EVF cannot compete with an OVF to start with.

Some purists will likely interject that EXIF data are not necessary and that one should concentrate on image content and forget about technical data. To this, I strongly disagree and see no reason why one should throw away a true advantage to digital camera technology. I consider the image degradation caused by the stop down metering the decisive reason why I stay away from the mirrorless offerings, though. Also important is the much shortened battery life.

On balance, I find no really weighty reasons to go mirrorless unless video use is paramount.

Per Inge Oestmoen, Norway

   Silent shooting making the mirrorless the way to go if you need it -I do-. Focus accuracy, both automatic and manual with evf magnification aid being the second one.

Ilkka Nissilš

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Re: FTZ limitations: Aperture lever
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2019, 16:37:40 »
If one uses a modern Zeiss lens (with CPU, i.e. ZF.2, Milvus or Otus) is wide open metering available or not (with FTZ)?

Birna RÝrslett

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Re: FTZ limitations: Aperture lever
« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2019, 17:04:45 »
If one uses a modern Zeiss lens (with CPU, i.e. ZF.2, Milvus or Otus) is wide open metering available or not (with FTZ)?

Metering is semi-wide open, meaning unless you doctor the FTZ as described elsewhere, it's done at f/5.6, or the widest aperture for any lens slower than this.