Author Topic: X-T3  (Read 1935 times)

armando_m

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #30 on: April 02, 2019, 15:43:39 »
Thanks for all the comments

Jaques, this is a crop, the image is probably 3° of field of view
Akira, I noticed the red channel had more info than the green and blue, but shooting from the city is hard to discern why
Olivier, so sorry, I'm having fun with a very capable camera
Tom, the colors are certainly not visible with your eyes, it takes quite a lot of images and processing to get to this result which is still so-so as I'm the middle of to much light pollution

Armando Morales
D800, Nikon 1 V1, Fuji X-T3

armando_m

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #31 on: April 10, 2019, 15:16:35 »
Tried it at the studio, got a few funny looks from the other photographers, after a while they started asking questions
Armando Morales
D800, Nikon 1 V1, Fuji X-T3

Ian Watson

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2019, 21:26:02 »
The camera seems very capable in your hands, Armando. How do you find the ergonomics?

Akira

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #33 on: April 11, 2019, 00:34:42 »
Tried it at the studio, got a few funny looks from the other photographers, after a while they started asking questions

 :D :D :D
"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

"Limitation is inspiration." - Akira

armando_m

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2019, 02:50:43 »
Ian,
Operating the rear dial while looking through the viewfinder is difficult as I'm a left eye shooter so I reconfigured the front dial to adjust time and the rear dial to adjust aperture, which I'll be able to adjust on the lens once I get something else than the 27mm.

Also when using the viewfinder the touch screen better left off, or I end up doing odd things when my nose touches the screen

Still it does not feel like it belongs in my hand like the feeling I get when I grab the D800

I feel the camera to small when lifted to my face, but people smile back when they see me with the x-t3, a reaction I do not get when using the D800.

I have already filled the my menu with settings I want to adjust quickly without scrolling through list after list, I did the same thing on the d800

There is more to like than to dislike, so far the camera helps me get the picture, rather than me fighting the camera to get a picture, like I feel when using the V1.
Armando Morales
D800, Nikon 1 V1, Fuji X-T3

Hugh_3170

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2019, 05:40:15 »
Kudos Armando - large strides already made by you with your new X-T3. 

Do you see the X-T3 as a replacement for your V1 as a more capable walk around system or as a replacement for your venerable D800?  Just curious.
Hugh Gunn

armando_m

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2019, 21:09:08 »
I'm not sure yet, so far I have not picked up the V1 or the D800 since getting the x-t3

I'm limited for what I can do having only the 27mm lens, but the adapted nikon lenses are fun

here is portrait using the 105 f2.5, jpg sooc, resized in cnx2

Armando Morales
D800, Nikon 1 V1, Fuji X-T3

Ian Watson

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2019, 05:55:41 »
Thank you for your thoughts, Armando. The Fuji X system is quite appealing. My main concern is that the camera is so small that it is fiddly to operate. I will certainly handle one myself in a shop. However, your extended experiences are of great interest!

Anthony

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #38 on: April 12, 2019, 11:14:09 »
The X-T3 certainly handles differently from the D800.  I find I hold it a bit more with the fingers and a bit less with the whole hand.  It is more like the Df than the D800.  Personally I like it a lot, but handling is something very personal.
Anthony Macaulay

Akira

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #39 on: April 12, 2019, 12:01:15 »
Beautiful portraits, Armando, regardless of the cameras you use!

By the way, folks,

if you feel the Fuji X cameras (basically any models) a bit too small, you may want to try to screw a soft release button into the release button of the camera.  This way, you can stretch your index finger and don't need to try to push the release button with your finger tip, which makes the holding of the camera noticeably more comfortable.

I've been using soft release buttons virtually all film cameras that I've had, Nikon F3, FM2, Leica M, Fuji GW680, etc. whose shutter buttons accommodated generic cable releases.

I use one on my X-E3 and never feel in need of removing it.  During the film days, you had to remove the button when you use a cable release, which would make you lose the tiny accessory.  On the other hand, now that we can control the cameras wirelessly using smartphones, you can leave the button permanently on your camera.
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Olivier

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #40 on: April 12, 2019, 15:39:08 »
I have large hands hand had an issue with the X-t1 initially. This was solved by adding a "large" grip (not a battery grip) that mostly increases the front bump and makes the handling easier. Not yet perfect, especially with moderately heavy lenses like the Nikkor 105mm + Lens Turbo reducer, but it is manageable.
This is actually what refrains me from getting the even smaller X-T30, probably too small for my hands.

Nice portrait, Armando!

Ian Watson

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #41 on: April 13, 2019, 22:09:19 »
My travels took me close to my favourite camera shop and I asked to see an X-T3. With my right little finger resting along the baseplate, the camera was much more pleasant to hold than I had feared. Anthony's description made perfect sense.

The salesman then added the grip. It is basically an Arca Swiss plate with a piece attached that makes the handgrip on the front of the camera deeper. It was a noticeable improvement. I could get along with an X-T3 and the grip.

pluton

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #42 on: April 13, 2019, 22:46:09 »
My Fuji XE-1, and later the XE-2s, absolutely required an add-on grip to make the camera handling meet my own modern standards.  It would be difficult for me to go back to the old-fashioned flat front camera, be it Leica M or Nikon Df, without adding a right-handed grip.
Keith B., Santa Monica, CA, USA

Akira

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #43 on: April 14, 2019, 06:50:59 »
I also use the genuine grip with the Arca-Swiss dovetail at the bottom for my X-E3.  Combined with the soft release button, the camera fits nicely in my hand.
"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

"Limitation is inspiration." - Akira

Lars Hansen

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Re: X-T3
« Reply #44 on: April 22, 2019, 14:37:26 »
Congrats Armando. Obviously a Fuji in very capable hands  :)

Like others I also felt the need for a better grip on my X-E1 - especially when using the Fuji 55-200 zoom or old heavy Minolta tele lenses. I got a SUNWAYFOTO Pfl-xe1 which is an L-bracket with a grip. It can be disassembled in 3 parts so that one can use it without the grip etc. It have worked quite well.
   
I agree with Akira regarding the use of a soft release button - unfortunately I've already lost 3 because they loosen so currently I don't have any.

I also use the genuine grip with the Arca-Swiss dovetail at the bottom for my X-E3.  Combined with the soft release button, the camera fits nicely in my hand.
Lars Hansen  .. with a Fujifilm X-E1