Author Topic: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968  (Read 395 times)

chals

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New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« on: January 07, 2019, 16:14:25 »
First Picture with my new Micro-Nikkor.

Birna Rørslett

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2019, 16:51:32 »
Apparently the compensating version -- but any of these old 55/3.5 Micro-Nikkor lenses were great. And still are.

chals

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2019, 16:59:46 »
Focus is smooth, quick aperture, clean optics. NOK 650/100$ including postage. Unbelievable. And yes, it is the aperture compensating model from between 1966-68.

Seapy

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2019, 17:35:47 »
Are those marks on the filter thread caused by the PB4 slide copying attachment second (shading) bellows?
Robert C. P.
South Cumbria, UK

chals

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2019, 17:55:04 »
I don’t know.

Bent Hjarbo

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2019, 18:14:24 »
The slide copying adapter has a the same mechanism as the old hoods and snap on lens cap, so it would only make a short track into the front thread.

Seapy

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2019, 18:20:21 »
They look like they could be. ;D  Something has been gripping in there but as you say the grip I am referring to only grips one thread, so I don't know what could have made those marks.

The PB4 bellows slide/negative copy attachment has a small shading bellows which clips into the filter threads of a 55mm Micro Nikkor with an expanding clip which grips the female filter threads top and bottom, very effective.

The thickness of the magnification bellows when fully collapsed seems to provide for 1:1 copy ratio when the 55 Micro lens is focused at about 0.35M.  Which is handy for copying slides and negatives.
Robert C. P.
South Cumbria, UK

Bent Hjarbo

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2019, 19:35:09 »
This is how my copy looks like. The bright spot, is the simple lighting used ;)
You can se the slight abrasion on the edge.

Roland Vink

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2019, 20:33:00 »
Are those marks on the filter thread caused by the PB4 slide copying attachment second (shading) bellows?
Some (most) look like reflections from the lighting used.

The black finish on the filter threads does wear off from screwing and unscrewing filters and other attachments. The grips on the original lens caps are also metal and cause wear on the filter threads. This sort of wear is usually generalised, you won't get spot wear unless the filter has been dented at one point.

chals

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2019, 20:52:14 »
The lens is close to perfect! As it is, theese days.

beryllium10

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Re: New Micro-Nikkor from 1966-1968
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2019, 05:24:03 »
I think you got a bargain.  You'll find it a really rewarding lens.  I have one of the more recent Ai variants, which I think cost $69, then one of the f/2.8s came my way for $59.  I've seen pre-Ai models in excellent condition going for $49.  Such prices are just absurdly low for the quality and capabilities of these lenses.   Nice photo of the salt-shaker too, by the way - I actually like the hexagonal blur highlights produced by the f/3.5.  Bokeh is in the eye of the beholder ...
Cheers, John