Author Topic: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!  (Read 1187 times)

richardHaw

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Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« on: December 23, 2018, 02:37:45 »
made these some time ago. The nikkormat is part of a long series about this camera covering the FT,FS,FTN,FT2,FT3,EL and hopefully the EL2 and ELW, too.  :o :o :o

Nikkormat FTN
https://richardhaw.com/2018/12/16/repair-nikkormat-ftn-part-1/

Nikon FE
https://richardhaw.com/2018/12/09/repair-nikon-fe/

Nikon FM2n
https://richardhaw.com/2018/11/23/repair-nikon-fm2n/

Hugh_3170

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2018, 14:53:10 »
Ric, in relationship to the Nikkormat FT and FTn, would it be possible please to detail the values of the resistors used in conjunction with their meter circuitry and to compare them with the corresponding components for the FT2 and the FT3?

What I am getting at here is the possibility of converting the FT and FTn Nikkormat versions to using easy to find Silver batteries rather than the now impossible to find Mercury cells or the very expensive Wein cells.

If I am just dreaming in respect of this idea/request, then don't be embarrassed to say so!  ;D

TIA


made these some time ago. The nikkormat is part of a long series about this camera covering the FT,FS,FTN,FT2,FT3,EL and hopefully the EL2 and ELW, too.  :o :o :o

Nikkormat FTN
https://richardhaw.com/2018/12/16/repair-nikkormat-ftn-part-1/

Nikon FE
https://richardhaw.com/2018/12/09/repair-nikon-fe/

Nikon FM2n
https://richardhaw.com/2018/11/23/repair-nikon-fm2n/
Hugh Gunn

richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2018, 17:59:28 »
Ric, in relationship to the Nikkormat FT and FTn, would it be possible please to detail the values of the resistors used in conjunction with their meter circuitry and to compare them with the corresponding components for the FT2 and the FT3?

What I am getting at here is the possibility of converting the FT and FTn Nikkormat versions to using easy to find Silver batteries rather than the now impossible to find Mercury cells or the very expensive Wein cells.

If I am just dreaming in respect of this idea/request, then don't be embarrassed to say so!  ;D

TIA

Hi! thats possible but there are 3 or so resistors on the FT/n  :o :o :o

well, i am actually planning to write an article on how to modify them using the shotky diodes. its a popular mod for the FTn and theres even a video for it.
its popular here in japan but many people use the MR adapters (not cheap) that regulates the voltage to 1.35v. I use these too but i think making a permanent mod is the way to go. the difference in my approach is i will install it at the bottom near the negative terminal  ::) the top is too crowded in my opinion.

now, most if not all people that I know who did this had to adjust the 0 level of the galvanometer, effectively adjusting the mete's accuracy by a bit. using a straight 1.5v battery will give you EV differences of about 2 stops or so but the modified ones using the diodes is within a stop. the reason for this lies in the repair manual. its advised to calibrate the FT/n by changing the fixed resistors (dumb decision but whatever) or playing around with the position of the brush in conjunction to variable resistor. both require disassembly and reassembly and is a waste of time. I should know, i wasted hours doing this. :'( :'( :'( the easiest way is to just push the galvanometer's adjuster so it will give you the "correct" display. this is not recommended according to the repair manual but is sometimes acceptable due to the bothersome and tedious process of calibrating the FT/n.

going back to the voltages. since there's plenty of combinations due to the fact that the fixed resistors aren't standard since they were selected to compensate the voltage, its probably futile to look for a "standard" value on the FT/n. this is also the reason why I always have to re-calibrate the galvanometers each time i make a transplant. I made successful meter and circuit transplants (its simple) several times from a good working one to a pretty camera with a dead one and the story is always the same. it's off by a stop or so.the annoying thing is that the FT family retained this up until the FT3, the only variable resistor you have is the one controlling the ISO and aperture and its a waste of time to calibrate these. I don't know why this had to be done like this, maybe Nikon wanted to cut cost. if you read the Nikon article on the Nikomat you will see that the marching order was to build it cheap and maybe variable resistors cost so much back then they its cheaper to pay for an engineer to calibrate it by soldering fixed resisters.

richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2018, 18:01:14 »
these are the usual things that I salvage. the fixed resisters show different colored stripes and that means that they can be "random" combination. :o :o :o

the nikkormats are wonderful but i hate working on them sometimes.

richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2018, 18:04:09 »
i would like to write a semi-detailed explanation on the Copal Square since i don't think anybody has gone through them in-depth. i don't know how these work but I do know that there are at least 3 adjustment points to adjust the speeds. 1 for the slow, 1 for the usual speeds and 1 for 1000 which doesnt always work  o :o :o

if anybody has a manual for these I would appreciate if you can share it. I would paypal you if it contains the information that I need. ::)
i think i have a japanese manual, i just need to search my manuals library...

Nasos Kosmas

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2018, 19:35:56 »
Hi Richard
I have a Nikon FM (my one and only bought in 1980) and the mirror gets down too early so in speeds 1/250 up to 1/1000 I get partially exposed film
The issue is that the local repair shop refused to repair  it , is it something I can do myself?  ;D

richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2018, 19:46:05 »
Hi Richard
I have a Nikon FM (my one and only bought in 1980) and the mirror gets down too early so in speeds 1/250 up to 1/1000 I get partially exposed film
The issue is that the local repair shop refused to repair  it , is it something I can do myself?  ;D

Hello. This sounds like the shutter is too fast?  ::)

I don't think you can do this on your own, these copal square shutters are notorious for being hard to adjust because you need to remove the whole shutter crate and winding it is not easy without a jig. a jig is easily made using a nikkormat corpse  :o :o :o

this sounds just about right because the square (depending on model) is adjusted by 1s, 1/2-125, and 250-1000. adjusting 1000 should give you correct 250-1000.
i hope that all you need to do is apply some grease after cleaning the cam. i doubt that it needs readjusting.


richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2018, 19:46:46 »
ah...found my manual!  :o :o :o

richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2018, 20:32:09 »
Hello. This sounds like the shutter is too fast?  ::)

I don't think you can do this on your own, these copal square shutters are notorious for being hard to adjust because you need to remove the whole shutter crate and winding it is not easy without a jig. a jig is easily made using a nikkormat corpse  :o :o :o

this sounds just about right because the square (depending on model) is adjusted by 1s, 1/2-125, and 250-1000. adjusting 1000 should give you correct 250-1000.
i hope that all you need to do is apply some grease after cleaning the cam. i doubt that it needs readjusting.

Now that I think about it all it may require is tensioning one of  the spring  :o :o :o

You will have to remove the front and top panels for this.

Nasos Kosmas

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2018, 21:30:23 »
I checked again, itís not the mirror as I thought , I kept  the mirror open and the issue didnít disappeared
Itís the shutters problem doesnít synchronize the first and the second curtain  does this mean something?
Thank you for your answers!

Hugh_3170

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #10 on: December 24, 2018, 01:04:32 »
Ric, thanks for your background information in response to my query. 

I guess that is why most people choose to put a diode into the meter circuit to drop the battery voltage.  I have seen both germanium and Schottky diodes being used.  The diode part numbers I am seeing are ECG109 and alternatives such as 1N34A and SK3090.  Putting these in under the base plate seems like a good idea.  I have seen an Olympus OM1 modified this way without taking the top plate off.


Hi! thats possible but there are 3 or so resistors on the FT/n  :o :o :o

well, i am actually planning to write an article on how to modify them using the shotky diodes. its a popular mod for the FTn and theres even a video for it.
its popular here in japan but many people use the MR adapters (not cheap) that regulates the voltage to 1.35v. I use these too but i think making a permanent mod is the way to go. the difference in my approach is i will install it at the bottom near the negative terminal  ::) the top is too crowded in my opinion.

now, most if not all people that I know who did this had to adjust the 0 level of the galvanometer, effectively adjusting the mete's accuracy by a bit. using a straight 1.5v battery will give you EV differences of about 2 stops or so but the modified ones using the diodes is within a stop. the reason for this lies in the repair manual. its advised to calibrate the FT/n by changing the fixed resistors (dumb decision but whatever) or playing around with the position of the brush in conjunction to variable resistor. both require disassembly and reassembly and is a waste of time. I should know, i wasted hours doing this. :'( :'( :'( the easiest way is to just push the galvanometer's adjuster so it will give you the "correct" display. this is not recommended according to the repair manual but is sometimes acceptable due to the bothersome and tedious process of calibrating the FT/n.

going back to the voltages. since there's plenty of combinations due to the fact that the fixed resistors aren't standard since they were selected to compensate the voltage, its probably futile to look for a "standard" value on the FT/n. this is also the reason why I always have to re-calibrate the galvanometers each time i make a transplant. I made successful meter and circuit transplants (its simple) several times from a good working one to a pretty camera with a dead one and the story is always the same. it's off by a stop or so.the annoying thing is that the FT family retained this up until the FT3, the only variable resistor you have is the one controlling the ISO and aperture and its a waste of time to calibrate these. I don't know why this had to be done like this, maybe Nikon wanted to cut cost. if you read the Nikon article on the Nikomat you will see that the marching order was to build it cheap and maybe variable resistors cost so much back then they its cheaper to pay for an engineer to calibrate it by soldering fixed resisters.
Hugh Gunn

richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2018, 01:22:30 »
i bought a batch of 1N5711  :o :o :o

Lorne

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2018, 23:28:59 »
Richard, thanks for your articles about the Nikkormat and FE/FM series.

My first slr, new back in 1973, was a Nikkormat FTN. Unfortunately, it died an early death when an errant soccer ball struck the monopod and fractured the body at the tripod socket. I still have an FM3a and an EL, though I haven't exercised them much in the last 10 years. Might take a stab at learning to process b&w as an excuse to put them back in service.

By the way, if anyone is looking for an owner's booklet (French) for the FTN, I have now in very nice condition - free to anyone at NG.

I think there is a minor typo in the FM2n article. In the Introduction you say:

The Nikon FM2n is one of Nikonís longest-selling cameras. It was introduced in
1983 as an update to the very popular Nikon FM2 and the differences are subtle
but important. The flash sync is not 1/250s, an improved mirror box assembly has
been implemented, a new type of focusing screen replaced the older (dimmer) one
and a host of other changes that are too minor to point out but improves the
handling and reliability of the older design.


Did you mean to write now instead of not?
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richardHaw

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #13 on: December 25, 2018, 00:46:07 »
Richard, thanks for your articles about the Nikkormat and FE/FM series.

My first slr, new back in 1973, was a Nikkormat FTN. Unfortunately, it died an early death when an errant soccer ball struck the monopod and fractured the body at the tripod socket. I still have an FM3a and an EL, though I haven't exercised them much in the last 10 years. Might take a stab at learning to process b&w as an excuse to put them back in service.

By the way, if anyone is looking for an owner's booklet (French) for the FTN, I have now in very nice condition - free to anyone at NG.

I think there is a minor typo in the FM2n article. In the Introduction you say:

The Nikon FM2n is one of Nikonís longest-selling cameras. It was introduced in
1983 as an update to the very popular Nikon FM2 and the differences are subtle
but important. The flash sync is not 1/250s, an improved mirror box assembly has
been implemented, a new type of focusing screen replaced the older (dimmer) one
and a host of other changes that are too minor to point out but improves the
handling and reliability of the older design.


Did you mean to write now instead of not?

wow! thanks for the catch!  :o :o :o

i am now looking for a cheap fm3a

Lorne

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Re: Nikkormat FTN, Nikon FE and Nikon FM2n repair articles!
« Reply #14 on: December 25, 2018, 06:17:55 »
wow! thanks for the catch!  :o :o :o

i am now looking for a cheap fm3a

Glad to be of assistance.
I just took a look on eBay and was shocked that FM3a prices are so high: US$750-1000.
The FM3a feels so solid but light. And compared to my Df it is positively tiny.
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