Author Topic: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless  (Read 3608 times)

Ethan

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Re: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless
« Reply #90 on: May 15, 2018, 10:12:23 »
Just to change the direction of this discussion back towards the original question (Why the appeal of mirrorless?), Thom Hogan has a revealing article on his site today, about a Sony freebie he went on (http://www.sansmirror.com/newsviews/sony-kando-20.html).  It tells a great deal about how Sony creates the impression that they and their cameras are, as Thom puts it, "Fun, fascinating, fervent, festive, and fruitful. [...] It makes you want to create more photos, and more interesting photographs. It makes you want to stretch yourself and your gear to its limits." 

How is the trick done?  A lot is known about how it is done, because the pharmaceutical industry does it exactly the same way and that has been studied intensively for years.  Most people think the key is obvious: the money - a lot of money, in this case.  In fact, it isn't the money - although generosity is important.  The key is in how you get to go: "To get into Kando, you have to submit an essay as to why you should be there, and point to a body of work. I did, and I was accepted." Of course, the actual selection criteria are quite different from what they tell the "applicants": "I noticed most of the 150 that were accepted all had very visible and different kinds of Internet presence".  They didn't want photographers, they wanted "opinion leaders".   

This is straight out of the doctors-and-drug-companies playbook: there you are, working away in [name of city] and no one ever tells you what great work you are doing, and along comes Big Pharma/Sony and they think (or pretend to think) your research/photography is really good. Often, they also tell you they really want your input about their exciting, cutting-edge developments, and that makes sense, because you are an exciting, cutting-edge person.  Of course you get there and you feel creative and interesting and want to stretch yourself.  And those positive feelings transfer to the people who made you feel like that. 


 



 

Tom Hogan....ya da ...ya da ...ya da
Pay and talk internet amps never cease to amaze me,

C1P used by a large number of working pros if not the largest number is just waiting for Tom Hogan advice and he delivered by the shovel.

I am yet to see anyone enlarging any panel to work on an image. It is a bit silly to comment on a Panel taking space over an image when the demonstrator is doing it to "demonstrate".

Nevermind that Tom Hogan should know that in a professional environment, photographers work with dual monitors for both C1P and Photoshop. And I am not talking yet of the gear used for pro Color Grading.
As for the so called "grading"  dialog" which in fact is the Color Balance panel. It might occur to Tom Hogan that it is available in different modes namely the "3-way" mode with three dials or circles for the Shadow - Midtone and Highlight as he puts it. The other modes are a single dial for each of the Shadow - Midtone and Highlight.
In fact the total number of dials available are 5: Master - 3way (3 dials) - Highlight - Midtone - Shadow.

He really should pay more attention to his blurb!!

BruceSD

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Re: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless
« Reply #91 on: May 16, 2018, 01:32:46 »
I'm sticking with my DSLRs.

Lately I've been reading about concerns about eye injury from long term use of mirrorless EVFs.    The eye is very close to the light source, and certain wavelengths (blue?) can damage the retina and possibly cause cataracks and macular degeneration.

I have friends who will not buy a mirrorless camera because of these concerns...

Hugh_3170

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Re: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless
« Reply #92 on: May 16, 2018, 03:32:27 »
Against which looking into strong sunlight or laser radiation with an SLR with an optical view finder can definitely damage eyes.

And yes, I concede that if the intensity in a mirrorless EVF is cranked up too much eye damage may result.

I'm sticking with my DSLRs.

Lately I've been reading about concerns about eye injury from long term use of mirrorless EVFs.    The eye is very close to the light source, and certain wavelengths (blue?) can damage the retina and possibly cause cataracks and macular degeneration.

I have friends who will not buy a mirrorless camera because of these concerns...
Hugh Gunn

pluton

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Re: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless
« Reply #93 on: May 16, 2018, 04:41:44 »
Twice in the first paragraph about Capture One, Hogan uses the term 'Field Workflow', which I take to mean photo editing done on a single laptop screen.
Keith B., Santa Monica, CA, USA

pluton

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Re: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless
« Reply #94 on: May 16, 2018, 04:47:34 »
Against which looking into strong sunlight or laser radiation with an SLR with an optical view finder can definitely damage eyes.

And yes, I concede that if the intensity in a mirrorless EVF is cranked up too much eye damage may result.
Ha ha...I am convinced that my EVFs (in the 2 Fujis I have) are too feeble and dark to be a threat to vision, but it pays for everyone to be alert for the possibility of health issues with any technology, OLEDs included.
Also, I'm viewing through anti-UV coated eyeglasses.
Keith B., Santa Monica, CA, USA

RobOK

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Re: The relative merits of DSLRs and mirrorless
« Reply #95 on: May 22, 2018, 03:01:47 »
Dpreview's business model is to promote sales of new camera equipment;
......
I believe the camera review website industry has a strong motivation to push people to buy the new and make people unhappy with the old, because they live off advertisement clicks. They do not care about what is best for the photographer.

I think everyone knows the Amazon now owns dpreview.com so it's definitely in the sales generation mode... churn, churn, churn!