Author Topic: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens  (Read 1062 times)

RobOK

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Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« on: August 01, 2016, 20:24:10 »
Van Gogh with tilt shift or a 1.4 lens!

http://imgur.com/a/DqErg

Airy

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Re: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2016, 20:50:26 »
more than funny; interesting.
Airy Magnien

John Geerts

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Re: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2016, 22:27:55 »
Indeed interesting, change of perspective ;)

pluton

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Re: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2016, 20:21:09 »
The phenomenon of shallow depth of field does not exist in human vision, especially in bright light.  I wonder if any painters or illustrators of the pre-photographic period conceived of using it?
Keith B., Santa Monica, CA, USA

John Geerts

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Re: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2016, 21:57:20 »
Not really, I guess. 

Working with (candle) light and shadows creates a kind of shallow depth, Carrevagio, Georges de la Tour and Rembrandt worked with that principle. But Vermeer had a Camera Obscura and used these effects also in his paintings.  Here explained as Disks of Confusion.  Also other (photographical) techniques are described there.

Famous is 'View on Delft' were the foreground is 'unsharp' and the sand can be described as 'blurry' but the background (Delft) detailed.


Mongo

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Re: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2016, 03:20:39 »
fabulously wonderfully 3D !!

Les Olson

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Re: Van Gogh with a Tilt Shift Lens
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2016, 13:08:18 »
Not really, I guess. 

Working with (candle) light and shadows creates a kind of shallow depth, Carrevagio, Georges de la Tour and Rembrandt worked with that principle. But Vermeer had a Camera Obscura and used these effects also in his paintings.  Here explained as Disks of Confusion.  Also other (photographical) techniques are described there.

Famous is 'View on Delft' were the foreground is 'unsharp' and the sand can be described as 'blurry' but the background (Delft) detailed.


Leaving aside the question of whether Vermeer did use a camera obscura in his painting, a pinhole camera obscura has infinite depth of field: you do not see an unsharp foreground and sharp background.  A pinhole camera image has a "circle of confusion" due to diffraction, but its size depends on the pinhole size and it affects all parts of the image equally.