Author Topic: Scotland Question: Any mosquitos or other biting insects this time of year?  (Read 2144 times)

Andrea B.

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I'm just curious.  ;D
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Bjørn Rørslett

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Technically, a wood tick is not an insect. However, it doesn't care about such fine distinctions and certainly will bite you if the opportunity arises.

A small pair of tweezers is the instrument of choice to extract the tick. For those documenting the event, remember the tick is small so you need gear capable of doing 1:1.

Andrea B.

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Once a tick bites you does it stay in that place? Or do they bite you and then go somewhere else?
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Jacques Pochoy

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Once a tick bites you does it stay in that place? Or do they bite you and then go somewhere else?

Alas... They tend to bury their heads in your flesh and they go in very private spaces and folds making the search a quite intimate venture... :o
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Akira

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Once a tick bites you does it stay in that place? Or do they bite you and then go somewhere else?

Alas... They tend to bury their heads in your flesh and they go in very private spaces and folds making the search a quite intimate venture... :o

Yup, apparently it won't go away...

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Andrea B.

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So if you get a tick bite you would know because the tick is still attached to the bite.  ;D ;D ;D
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Bjørn Rørslett

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So if you get a tick bite you would know because the tick is still attached to the bite.  ;D ;D ;D

Not necessarily. If you are attacked by one of its earlier life stages, in particular the nymphs, they can do their nasty business then fall off. But mostly they stay put for days, unless interrupted, until they have sucked the blood they need to complete their current life stage.

Any way, tick inspection every evening before going to bed is strongly recommended. You don't feel their bite and may only detect the tick when it has swollen enough for your fingers to locate it as a "mole" or "bump" on the skin. They should be removed as quickly as possible to mitigate the risk of an infection of borrelia, meningitis, or whatever evil they are the vector for.

David Paterson

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I acknowledge nfoto's superior knowledge and experience of ticks, and they are certainly here in numbers . . . but, I haven't had a tick on me for at least the last three years, and I go out rough-walking every single day, sometimes twice. And there are often sheep in the adjoining field, and roe-deer virtually live in our garden.

A few simple precautions - don't wear shorts; tuck trousers into socks if in grass or other vegetation which comes above your boots; and lightly spray boots, socks and trouser-cuffs with insect-repellant if you are worried. (I've never actually done this myself, but it sounds like a good idea.)

The other Scottish menace - the midge - should not be active in early May.


Andrea B.

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socks?
trousers?

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David Paterson

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Yes, I'm afraid that little black number won't quite cut it here in Scotland.   ;D ;D ;D