NikonGear

Gear Talk => What the Nerds Do => Topic started by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 11, 2015, 13:43:11

Title: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 11, 2015, 13:43:11
[Posted 24 March 2010:  Article and image copyright Bjørn Rørslett ]

This is a short illustration of the process of CPU-converting ("chipping") a Nikkor lens. The example is the 18 mm f/3.5 Nikkor AIS. The 18 mm is not a very difficult lens to modify, but it does demonstrate some of the minor niggles often encountered when you set out to implant a CPU. Let's remember that these lenses never were designated to receive an internal CPU, so that it usually is possible might come as a surprise.

The first step is assembling the pieces.

Here is the lens, together with the CPU print, 5 signal pins, and the contact block.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532329.jpg)

Assembling the contact block is not rocket science, more like playing with Lego bricks.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532343.jpg)
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 13, 2015, 11:25:35
Here I have removed the rear light baffle (always black, it usually is secured by 3 small screws). We're looking straight into the internals of the lens, and immediately note two problem areas.

1. There is not sufficient space for the contact block, so material must be removed from inside of the bayonet mount.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532349.jpg)


2. The aperture coupling slider has two screws the heads of which potentially will interfere with the print. These heads need to be sanded down to be flush against the surface of the slider. An easy task suitable for any keen Dremel user.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532355.jpg)
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 13, 2015, 11:30:42
Now, time to drill the two holes for the retaining screws for the contact block. An 1.25(-1.5) mm bit is suitable. I frequently use a jig so it's easy to drill the holes in a correct position. Pin number 4 of the block has to line up precisely with the centre of the topmost bayonet screw (the one adjacent the the index mark on the lens). This correct position will be evident on the next pictures.

After drilling, the holes must be countersunk so the screws come flush to the surface. Otherwise, the lens will jam when it is attached to the camera. The material of the mount rim must be thinned on the inside, if necessary, to keep its thickness to 0.8-0.9 mm in the area where the contact block is to be inserted. Older lenses may have the required thickness already, whilst most AIS lenses need to be trimmed. Only do the removal of material on the inside of the mount.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532363.jpg)

Here is the contact block in the correct orientation, and it's easy to see that we now have plenty of space for it in the bayonet mount. The mount has been trimmed on the inside to give the appropriate thickness (0.8-0.9mm) as well.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532377.jpg)

The contact block, with the CPU print, is put into its place and secured by the retaining screws.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532383.jpg)
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 13, 2015, 11:33:50
Now, the bayonet is put back onto the lens and the print dressed so it doesn't snag on any moving parts inside. It's beneficial to make a paper dummy if the placement of the print is deemed difficult. The print is fairly delicate and should not be bent back and forth excessively.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532389.jpg)

Make a cut-out in the rear light baffle to accomodate the contact block, and fasten the baffle with at least 2 screws. Sometimes, the locking screw of the mount is one of these and this has always to be present. In the case of the 18 mm, we managed to save all three holes, so all three screws can be used (and the locking screw didn't need to be touched at all). This will vary from lens to lens, though.

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532395.jpg)
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 13, 2015, 11:35:46
Here is the completed and rejuvenated 18 mm f/3.5 S Ai-P lens. It is now compatible with each and every Nikon "F" mount camera ever made, and will meter on all of them. You can dial in the apertures from the camera, or use the aperture ring (if the camera allows this operational mode). All metering modes are available, and you can use exposure program modes A, M, P, and S.

(by the way, all illustrations are hand-held snapshots with the D3S/125 APO-Lanthar, 12800 ISO).

(http://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2011/post-24-129983532409.jpg)

That's all, folks !!

(note to self: dust off lens before taking the product shots. The CV 125 APO is darned sharp so all dust specks are mercilessly shown. And let Erik drill the mounting holes, he does a much neater job than me :D )
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 21, 2015, 01:07:11
It is worth noting that most medium or longer focal length lenses don't need the cut-out in the bayonet mount itself. The case of the 18 mm exemplifies the typical shape of the bayonet for Nikkors such as 20, 24, 28 mm etc. These shorter lenses also requires a short (5-pin) contact block from an AF/AFD/IX-Nikkor or third-party lens, whilst most other lenses are well served by any long block (7-10 pins; of which only 5 are used) found on AFS lenses.

A cut-out of the rear light baffle, on the other hand, always is necessary, otherwise there will be no space in which to seat the contact block.

The typical layout of the CPU print is the "L" shape shown in this walk-through example. The "L" is a general-purpose form factor that can be used with most lenses.  There are other specialised shapes as well, and they can  facilitate the modification of some otherwise tricky lenses. The 35/1.4, 16/3.5, and 85/1.4, to name some, can only be modified with CPU print with alternate print layouts.

The time necessary for the modification ranges from 15 minutes for the easiest ones to a whole work day for the really difficult challenges.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 21, 2015, 01:18:51
In answer to the following

" I am just curious how would this chipping allow the dial on the camera to set the aperture? "


It does, believe me. The technical explanation is rather long, so I'll skip it. But there is no magic involved.

You  can also realise this is happening since the "P" and "S" modes are available and fully functional; they both work by changing the actual aperture on the lens.

The CPU chips can be programmed to work both in "P" ( the AI-P designation originally used by Nikon for 45/2.8, 500/4, and 1200-1700/5.6-8)  or "G" mode, which encompass virtually all AF lenses made the last 30 years. All AF and AFS lenses also are AI-S, meaning they have a linear aperture mechanism. To complicate the matter further, Ai-P are also Ai-S. Nikon never made their nomenclature crystalline clear. The problem is mainly the earlier classes of lenses, pre-AI (before 1977) or AI (1977-ca. 1981). The pre-AI class can be converted to AI (often designated AI'd) so I treat both under the AI category.

Initially, there is no difference as both kinds will allow the aperture to be set from the camera side and on the surface, all exposure programs (A, M, S, P) will be functional if a CPU is added to them. However, although the read-out metering value is correct in both cases, the actual exposure can differ substantially. This is because the camera calculates the amount to stop down the lens (actually, the travel of the stop-down plunger inside the camera) based on a linear model, but the aperture movement of the AI/AI-modied Nikkors is non-linear. So for example, the meter reading says f/8, 1/250 (and these are the settings you get with an AIS lens), the actual settings at the time of the exposure might be f/11, 1/250 for the AI due to the non-linearity. Thus, one easily gets underexposure with the AI kind.

However, if the aperture is set directly on the lens, using the aperture ring, both meter reading and the actual exposure will coincide, and there is no difference between AI/AI'd or AIS lenses.
 
The contact block acts as a control interface and simply relays the electric signals from the CPU print. In addition, there is the CPU, that does the real stuff.

If you employ a factory CPU unit scavenged from a broken lens, its signature cannot be changed. In some cases, using a unit from a zoom lens, you can fake a lens signature by short-circuiting the section that reports the focal length as this will alter the maximum aperture sent to the camera. However, such factory prints are large and bulky and very few lenses have the required space to host them. The customised CPUs shown in this thread are always the better and easier approach.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: richardHaw on February 05, 2016, 07:29:16
Hello, is this the daisy chip that I have been reading a lot about? Thanks!
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on February 05, 2016, 08:33:55
Naah. You are thinking of the 'Dandelion' chip that is a low quality product and quite likely to get damaged in use. (Seen some of those failures over the years).

My CPU chips are custom made and hand assembled. Each is carefully tested before shipping. They are programmed to the exact specifications of the hosting lens, and that includes EXIF showing the correct zooming range for a zoom lens. Depending on the actual lens to be used with, I program them either as "P" or "G" mode of operation. I recommend they be mounted with factory contact blocks so as to provide maximum reliability and robustness.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: richardHaw on February 05, 2016, 08:41:59
Naah. You are thinking of the 'Dandelion' chip that is a low quality product and quite likely to get damaged in use. (Seen some of those failures over the years).

My CPU chips are custom made and hand assembled. Each is carefully tested before shipping. They are programmed to the exact specifications of the hosting lens, and that includes EXIF showing the correct zooming range for a zoom lens. Depending on the actual lens to be used with, I program them either as "P" or "G" mode of operation. I recommend they be mounted with factory contact blocks so as to provide maximum reliability and robustness.

Thank you! i have always wanted to chip some of my lenses but i just cannot source cheap ones here in Japan  :o :o :o
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Erik Lund on February 05, 2016, 09:01:34
I don't think Bjørn's CPU's are expensive, especially since they are same quality/identical to Nikon parts ;)
They come highly recommended!

Dandelion CPU's are very fragile, and really the only application where I can say they work on a heavily used lens is for the 50mm 1.2 Ais, where it can be integrated into the F-Mount.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: richardHaw on February 05, 2016, 09:05:41
Thanks! yes, dandelion! all i know is that it was named after a flower starting with the letter d.

i am hoping to chip my lenses without any modification or at best minimal...

now, since nobody is offering this service here in japan, maybe i can start offering the service myself...
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on February 05, 2016, 09:15:12
I am luckily in a position where I can order Nikon parts such as the factory contact assemblies and their specialised screws. Or in principle any other part in their vast inventory. The pricing policy of such items is 'strange' to put it mildly and most stuff can be frightfully expensive, so if you build an entire new camera from spare parts it'll probably cost 10x or more the street price. The contact block parts come in a middle position and getting the blocks as factory spares can be cheaper than buying junked lenses to scavenge parts from. Plus most junk lenses are cheap consumer 'kit' zooms that use inferior components and their contact assemblies are often plastic-based, not metal as the genuine stuff.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: richardHaw on February 05, 2016, 09:36:59
not sure if i can do that myself!  :o :o :o
in the past 10 years of my career, i actually do more programming and technical stuff than creative things but i still lack the practical electrical engineering skills do produce these chips! (apart from photo-etching,etc)

how much do these chips cost? the dandelion ones cost around JPY3000 each I think that is way beyond my budget  :-[
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on February 05, 2016, 09:57:05
I usually sell them for USD 45-50* each plus shipping and handling. Thus the unit price depends on the number ordered.
* recent prices have been higher as parts cost apparently increase exponentially over time
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: richardHaw on February 05, 2016, 10:01:59
maybe we should discuss about the price this in private  :o :o :o
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Edgy01 on May 13, 2016, 07:18:47
Thank you, Bjørn, for such clear, lucid explanations of this process. 

Dan
Santa Barbara, CA
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: John G on June 01, 2016, 11:27:36
Hi Bjorn
            I am interested by the comments on the dandelion chip, as to the fragility of them when on a Nikon Lens.
I have witnessed two destroyed on the same lens. The first one had a collapsed wall exposing all the pins after about one year of use, the second had the single pin dislodge and break of after a couple uses. I am not sure if the D800E camera body or TC 16A is the culprit.
I really enjoy the way the Lens / camera interacts with a CPU modified lens, so at present I would like to find a more robust chip that will offer longer life and user confidence.

Will the chip you offer fit into a dandelion cut out, or will further modification to the lens be required.

John 
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 01, 2016, 13:29:52
My chips are mounted into Nikon stock contact blocks, which have a metal backing and are retained by dedicated screws. Thus they have the same longevity and robustness as any current Nikkor coming with factory CPU.

Nearly all lenses will require a cut-out in the black stray light baffle. The rim of the bayonet mount also have to be the correct thickness, 0.8 to 0.9 mm, in the area where the contact block is to be seated (this seating is already present in all modern bayonets). Thus it is likely additional metal work will be required. One also has to drill and countersink the two holes for the retaining screws.

Depending on the lens to be modified, the installation can take anything from a few minutes to hours for the really tricky ones.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: John G on June 01, 2016, 15:34:59
Hi Bjorn
              The immediate lens I would like to have a CPU fitted to is a 300mm f2.8 ED IF AIS.
               If you have a CPU that will work with this lens, please let me know.
              I would also like to put one into a 85mm f1.4  and a 200mm f4, as I already own these.
               As these are used hand held or on a monopod.
              I am not sure of the benefits for a 24mm f2.8 as this is usually on a tripod mount set to infinity focus
              with a remote shutter release . 
              I am at present actively looking to purchase a 800mm f5.6  and a Micro Nikkor 105mm.
               each I feel would be enhanced in their use by the focus trap option.   
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 01, 2016, 17:12:23
My CPUs are programmable to fit virtually any lens, also those way off the limits of Nikkor specifications ... (camera read-out will only work for f/1 to f/95, because only two digits are used).

Perhaps an idea to start with the 300/2.8, as this is a very easy one to modify?
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: tdoan on June 29, 2016, 13:55:20
Good morning Bjørn

(crossing my fingers :) )Do you have the cpu for the 75-150 series e available for order? Have read your lens survey over so many times that if it was a paperback, I would have been on my 3rd edition at least. 

Thank you Bjørn
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: golunvolo on June 29, 2016, 15:53:15
Bjørn, after reviewing this, putting the chip on the BR2A I used for the Heligon, should be little more than two holes with countersunk  and tightening the screws. Am I wrong?
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 29, 2016, 17:07:55
Good morning Bjørn

(crossing my fingers :) )Do you have the cpu for the 75-150 series e available for order? Have read your lens survey over so many times that if it was a paperback, I would have been on my 3rd edition at least. 

Thank you Bjørn


No problem. Just order. Do you need the entire kit (ie CPU, contact block, screws)? I also recommend renting a drill jig template so as to ensure a precise positioning of the screws.

Send me a PM. The 75-150 is a very easy lens to modify and over the years I have delivered dozens of CPU kits for it.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Bjørn Rørslett on June 29, 2016, 17:11:11
Bjørn, after reviewing this, putting the chip on the BR2A I used for the Heligon, should be little more than two holes with countersunk  and tightening the screws. Am I wrong?

No you are not. Just ensure the material thickness in the region touched by the contact block is 0.8-0.9mm and all is fine. Do note that the older bayonets were typically slimmer than the newer ones and the thinnest of them all were the M/M2 bayonets from the original Nikon F era. These mounts usually don't need any further trimming.

The retaining screws are the acid test here at the correct rim thickness they 'bite' completely into the rear metal guard and hold the entire package firmly in place. They should not protrude more than a tiny fraction of a mm outside the guard plate at most.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Peter McLennan on June 29, 2016, 17:48:40
Amazing that this is even possible.
Also amazing that those documenting images are all hand held!
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Peter_S on December 01, 2016, 12:55:35
Hi All,
I'm new in this Forum and it seems to be the most interesting photography forum.
Thanks a lot for the possibility to choin.

I chipped more than 10 lenses with Dandelion Chips. Programming is perfect BUT mechanics are as Bjorn said. If they are mounted to far away from the Center/outside of the bayonette they will die after a certain time.
The latest lenses I chipped all work fine, but the beginning was hard.
The solution of Bjorn is clearly the better way, I'm always afraid a Dandelion could die in my D800 or other cam.....
Working with old non AI, AI and AIS lenses is real fun. Mechanically and optically they are superb and chipped they are perfect.

Peter
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Stefan-G on November 14, 2017, 04:05:51
I don't think Bjørn's CPU's are expensive, especially since they are same quality/identical to Nikon parts ;)
They come highly recommended!

Dandelion CPU's are very fragile, and really the only application where I can say they work on a heavily used lens is for the 50mm 1.2 Ais, where it can be integrated into the F-Mount.
Hi Erik, I know this post is over a year old, but I'm very interested in what you mean by 'integrated into the F-mount'. Do you mean integrated into the camera? Or do you find space for the chip in the 50/1.2? How are you doing that? I gave up on chipping the 50/1.2, after trying to thin (by sanding from the inside) a Dandelion chip and have it fall apart before it was thin enough to fit.

Otherwise, the Dandelion chips in my AI/AIS lenses have held up very well so far, but I'm not a heavy user. Mine are simply super-glued.

PS: I'm glad I can finally post here! Last time I registered (several years ago), I was disappointed that the free accounts didn't have access to the hardware forum, but that policy seems to have changed now. My account had disappeared, so I was able to register the same name again.

Update: just seeing you started a thread on that very topic! Too bad, so you still have to cut into the rear element, if I read your thread correctly. That's what I found last time I looked into this topic on photo.net (see https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/rotate-rear-element-of-50-1-2-ais.459797/ ) . Could you post a picture of what that cut/machining looks like, and more importantly how you did it? I also see you machined down the front of the Dandelion chip, to make it fit into a slot you cut into the lens mount. I assume that's to make it sturdier than just slotting the baffle/mount with two radial cuts? Do you have pics of the machined down chip before inserting into the lens?
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Erik Lund on November 14, 2017, 13:44:22
Hi Erik, I know this post is over a year old, but I'm very interested in what you mean by 'integrated into the F-mount'. Do you mean integrated into the camera? Or do you find space for the chip in the 50/1.2? How are you doing that? I gave up on chipping the 50/1.2, after trying to thin (by sanding from the inside) a Dandelion chip and have it fall apart before it was thin enough to fit.

Otherwise, the Dandelion chips in my AI/AIS lenses have held up very well so far, but I'm not a heavy user. Mine are simply super-glued.

PS: I'm glad I can finally post here! Last time I registered (several years ago), I was disappointed that the free accounts didn't have access to the hardware forum, but that policy seems to have changed now. My account had disappeared, so I was able to register the same name again.

Update: just seeing you started a thread on that very topic! Too bad, so you still have to cut into the rear element, if I read your thread correctly. That's what I found last time I looked into this topic on photo.net (see https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/rotate-rear-element-of-50-1-2-ais.459797/ (https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/rotate-rear-element-of-50-1-2-ais.459797/) ) . Could you post a picture of what that cut/machining looks like, and more importantly how you did it? I also see you machined down the front of the Dandelion chip, to make it fit into a slot you cut into the lens mount. I assume that's to make it sturdier than just slotting the baffle/mount with two radial cuts? Do you have pics of the machined down chip before inserting into the lens?
Thanks for joining ;)
This is a relatively new Revival of NikonGear. You will see if you look at the intduction at the top of the site.
http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,15.0.html (http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,15.0.html)

This is the thread with 55mm 1.2
http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,6603.0.html (http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,6603.0.html)


I’m currently working on the 50mm 1.2 as well.


You can’t turn the optics, I guess you know by now, the lens will hit the aperture leaver in the camera mirror box!


I’ll update the thread linked above with progress,,, ;)
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: acgiannopo on February 11, 2019, 18:33:23
Hi there.
Are you still make those chips and sell them? I am really interested since they are a lot thinner i guess than the dandelion ones. I have some of old ai-s's that i'd like to chip.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Birna Rørslett on February 11, 2019, 19:31:45
No, I have sold off nearly all of my inventory and have no plans for new production batches. Too much money to invest and too much hassle with orders and helping people getting into trouble with their chipping projects.

I do have a few handful of chips and parts to ensure I can process own new lenses if need arises 2-3 times a year. That's all.

I take the opportunity to say the current situation is a pity as the Z cameras do benefit from having chipped lenses. (like the Nikon DSLRs in that respect, in particular the middle- to lower-end models).
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: acgiannopo on February 11, 2019, 20:06:46
Thank you for your answer. Would you recommend using the dandelion ones?
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Birna Rørslett on February 11, 2019, 20:11:59
At present there are hardly any alternatives. Do note the dandelions are infamous for being brittle and breaking up. Thus it is paramount they are mounted to make the contact pins rub a minimum against the camera contacts when the lens is mounted or removed. Having a lens jammed or the chip falling into the mirror box in the field can be troublesome to say the least

AI and AI'd lenses do not comply well with the logic of Dandelion programming, at least they didn't the last time I tried the combination. Thus stick to AIS lenses.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Birna Rørslett on February 11, 2019, 20:21:04
This is Erik's solution with the Dandelion and the 50/1.2, by the way. Even when "hidden" and supported like this, I have had failures of the dandelion chip.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: acgiannopo on February 11, 2019, 20:36:12
Are they just glued or solderd on the flange? I wonder if this an appropriate way of just gluing the pins in every lens. Thank you for posting this image, i guess it's a lot helping for everyone having a 50mm f/1.2 ai-s
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Birna Rørslett on February 11, 2019, 20:51:39
The pins need to be able to move in-out. They are spring-loaded.
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Erik Lund on February 12, 2019, 07:50:26
There are some images and info on Dandelions in this thread:


http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,6603.0.html (http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,6603.0.html)

As B states, fragile and only recommended as last solution,,,


BTW plenty of threads here if you search for Dandelion


Here with B's CPU version, The real thing ;)

35mm 1.4 Ais
http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,3459.15.html (http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,3459.15.html)

58mm 1.2 Ai
http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,276.0.html (http://nikongear.net/revival/index.php/topic,276.0.html)
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Erik Lund on February 12, 2019, 14:37:36
I would not recommend doing this unless you are a skilled DIY, and are willing to buy a handful of Dandelions and try it out.


I think B. has chipped more or less all manual focus Nikkor-F lenses, except a few for obvious reasons.


One we didn't chip was the rental 6mm f/2.8 Ais i used in Scotland  :o


The image B posted above with a Dandelion is actually a 50mm 1.2 Ais - I done that one 3 times as well as 55mm 1.2


Please note there is very big difference between Dandelion and the real CPU implementation for these super fast lenses
Title: Re: Chipping a Nikkor - A Walk-through
Post by: Jack Dahlgren on February 12, 2019, 18:10:44
I would not recommend doing this unless you are a skilled DIY, and are willing to buy a handful of Dandelions and try it out.


I think B. has chipped more or less all manual focus Nikkor-F lenses, except a few for obvious reasons.


One we didn't chip was the rental 6mm f/2.8 Ais i used in Scotland  :o


The image B posted above with a Dandelion is actually a 50mm 1.2 Ais - I done that one 3 times as well as 55mm 1.2


Please note there is very big difference between Dandelion and the real CPU implementation for these super fast lenses

What sort of data and what sort of protocol do the chips use? I know Birna doesn't want to make any more, but maybe if there is some interest someone will pick it up.