Author Topic: A story of old and new lenses  (Read 2245 times)

Akira

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2018, 11:06:29 »
Note: the AFS 20/1.8 has 77mm filter (not 72mm as stated in your first post). The AFS 24/1.8 has 72mm filter so a bit smaller. Apart from that, the two lenses are almost identical size and weight. See http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/specs.html#20
Many photographers find 24mm as the goldilocks of wide-angles - wide enough for that "wide" look, but not too wide - just right. But everyone is different. The choice might depend on what other lenses you regularly use...

Agree with Roland.  Both 20/1.8G and 24/1.8G are practically identical in size, especially the dedicated petal-shaped hoods are put on.
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Roland Vink

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #31 on: July 14, 2018, 20:58:06 »
Roland, thanks for the correction but either 72mm or 77mm would be still a hassle to have to find and buy filters etc. Already have all the stuff for the 52mm f3.5. Would only be viable to do all this if the 20mm f1.8 was a compelling “have to buy” lens over the one Mongo already has. Not sure Mongo is there yet.
Which filters do you use? I use filters much less than when I shot film, so filter size is less important (although it is still nice to have a consistent size among lenses). Colour correction filters are not needed due to camera white-balance. I rarely use a polariser any more, it doesn't seem to work as well on digital, often resulting in loss of contrast that never happened in film.

If you do use filters, the 77mm filter size of the 20/1.8 is the same as many others including several wide zooms, the 85/1.4, 70-200/2.8 and 300/4, so it might be a useful size to have??

If you really want a more compact wide angle with better quality than the AI 20/3.5, the only other options are Leica, or Sony with the Loxia 21/2.8 but that's a lot of cash... :o

Mongo

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #32 on: July 15, 2018, 01:07:19 »
Thanks Roland. First, Mongo agrees with you re the polariser. It does not work at all well on digital - a lot of undesirable effects. The more exotic brands of wide angle are also not on Mongo's list for reasons of price and mostly, the relatively performance for the price. You are better off with he 20mm f1.8 Nikon in most casses.
In terms of filters, Mongo uses a graduated filter and full on neutral density filter, a good quality UV for protection (despite what others say about this). Lastly, Mongo has a small stack of great coloured graduated filters in the French "Cromofilter" brand. All filters Mongo has for this f3.5 lens are of course, 52mm size and take up very little space. You can imagine how difficult and expensive it would be to even try and find equivalents in an equally good brand for all of these in 77mm. The more Mongo thinks about this, the more he is inclined to stick with the f3.5 for now.

Frank Fremerey

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2018, 08:24:41 »
every decision will be a better decision now because it is a more informed decision
You are out there. You and your camera. You can shoot or not shoot as you please. Discover the world, Your world. Show it to us. Or we might never see it.

Mongo

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #34 on: July 15, 2018, 09:55:52 »
every decision will be a better decision now because it is a more informed decision

Absolutely for sure Frank. Thanks to everyone giving whatever information , experience and views they have about this, the decision will be as well informed as it can be. One last thing Mongo will do is see his friend and ask to use his newly acquired 20mm f1.8 for a day on one of our usual outings and see if that makes any difference to the current position Mongo has reached.

Again, sincere thanks to all for their useful comments

Roland Vink

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2018, 00:00:21 »
One more lens that hasn't been mentioned: the Cosina-Voigtlander 20mm 3.5 Skopar. It's equally small as the AI 20/3.5, accepting 52mm filters. It is a newer design and has an aspherical lens. I haven't seen any reviews which directly compare it to the older Nikkor, reviews generally show good central sharpness but weaker corners, which seems rather similar to the Nikkor. This discussion at dpreview (https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3668056) has mixed opinions about the Skopar, I can only guess the discussion members have different expectations and ways of using this lens, with a fair dose of sample variation thrown in... :o. Just thought I'd mention this lens for completeness, for the price the AFS 20/1.8 seems a better option.

Airy

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #36 on: July 16, 2018, 00:21:44 »
Ken Rockwell did a 20mm comparison that includes the various old Nikkors and the Skopar. He singles out corner performance, which is certainly not the sole criterion, but that's interesting nonetheless.
Airy Magnien

Akira

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #37 on: July 16, 2018, 04:57:55 »
I looked into the 20/3.5 Skopar, but discarded the idea after seeing the review by LensTip.com:

https://www.lenstip.com/index.html?test=obiektywu&test_ob=274

Apparently the image quality struggles at the corners, and moustache distortion is fairly obvious.
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Mongo

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #38 on: July 16, 2018, 12:12:13 »
Thanks again for the added advice.

Well, the unthinkable has happened. One of our members chanced into a camera shop 4000 kilometres away across Australia and saw a great looking used 20mm f1.8. He was kind enough to send Mongo a PM about this. Mongo contacted the store this morning and purchased what appears to be a near mint copy of the lens for a ridiculously low price. Used copies in Australia are almost non-existent. For that amount and condition, it was a no brainer - just bought it and now have the option of going either way after a good opportunity to assess it.  It should arrive in 2 days.

A very sincere thanks for all your advice and input with this decision.
No one could have predicted what happened in the last 24 hours.

Seapy

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #39 on: July 16, 2018, 12:41:11 »
Mongo has been very lucky!

An example of the wonders of the internet and the generosity of the members here to look out for each other, in this case literally!
Robert C. P.
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Jack Dahlgren

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #40 on: July 16, 2018, 22:38:36 »
Thanks again for the added advice.

Well, the unthinkable has happened. One of our members chanced into a camera shop 4000 kilometres away across Australia and saw a great looking used 20mm f1.8. He was kind enough to send Mongo a PM about this. Mongo contacted the store this morning and purchased what appears to be a near mint copy of the lens for a ridiculously low price. Used copies in Australia are almost non-existent. For that amount and condition, it was a no brainer - just bought it and now have the option of going either way after a good opportunity to assess it.  It should arrive in 2 days.

A very sincere thanks for all your advice and input with this decision.
No one could have predicted what happened in the last 24 hours.

Good luck with it! Will be good to hear if it meets expectations or exceeds them.

Mongo

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #41 on: July 17, 2018, 00:25:21 »
Mongo has been very lucky!

An example of the wonders of the internet and the generosity of the members here to look out for each other, in this case literally!

Absolutely Seapy ! Not so much luck as the generosity of members to help each others as this thread had demonstrated. So many of you helped by giving whatever knowledge and experience you could. Mongo is most grateful.

Seapy

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #42 on: July 17, 2018, 00:33:16 »
At least this enables Mongo to keep both versions.

While there is more to photography than Sunsets, to have an exceptional Sunset capable lens in Mongo's bag must be a great asset.
Robert C. P.
South Cumbria, UK

Mongo

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #43 on: July 17, 2018, 00:34:51 »
Good luck with it! Will be good to hear if it meets expectations or exceeds them.

Thanks Jack. From all indications given by the various members about this lens (including your good self), it will not doubt, not disappoint. Admittedly, despite what Mongo thought about the impracticability of having both lenses, he now thinks if you end up with both through fortuitous  circumstances, it gives you some real choice and you need not take both out with you if you know (in advance)  what sort of shooting you have in mind e.g the f1.8 for astro work, the f3.5 if shooting into the sun and for scenes  requiring a 10 stop ND or other filters etc.

Jack Dahlgren

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Re: A story of old and new lenses
« Reply #44 on: July 17, 2018, 02:46:02 »
Thanks Jack. From all indications given by the various members about this lens (including your good self), it will not doubt, not disappoint. Admittedly, despite what Mongo thought about the impracticability of having both lenses, he now thinks if you end up with both through fortuitous  circumstances, it gives you some real choice and you need not take both out with you if you know (in advance)  what sort of shooting you have in mind e.g the f1.8 for astro work, the f3.5 if shooting into the sun and for scenes  requiring a 10 stop ND or other filters etc.

I tried it out with a polarizing filter and it worked pretty well.
807_2409

Here is the worst with polarizer and the sun:
807_2398

Mostly it is much better behaved.